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Old 21st November 2003, 09:39
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shuklan shuklan is offline
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Baan: B4c4, sp10, India Localization - DB: MS SQL Server 2000 - OS: WIndows 2000 Advance Server
Hi Gavin
i have some documentation which says as follows.

The Enterprise Modeler module comprises the following business objects:
A) Master Data
B) Reference Models
C) Project Models
These business objects must be used in a certain order to work according to the concept behind the Enterprise Modeler.
Before any models representing organization typologies (reference models) or specific organizations (project models) can be made, some master data must be entered. First, a version must be defined for which a model is to be created. Based on this model, the desired BAAN IV components will be selected, the parameters will be set, the user dialogs will be created, and the performance indicators will be monitored. Second, the components that are used in the models must be defined as master data. This data includes such components as business functions, business processes, and rules. This master data is placed in a so-called repository, which contains the building blocks for the models that will be created.
Next, the reference models representing the best-practice situation of organizations with a certain organization typology must be created. Each reference model consists of a business function model, an organization model, and a business process model. Each reference model mainly consists of three models, namely, a business function model, an organization model, and a business process model. Respectively, these models describe the business functions in an organization, the (hierarchical) structure of the organization, and the working order of the activities needed to fulfill the business functions. The business function models and business process models of the reference models are built by copying functions and processes from the repository in which these components were predefined in the Master Data business object.Finally, the project models representing the situation of one specific organization can be created. These models are similar to reference models, except for the fact that they are specific to one organization in particular.
In principle, a project model is created based on a reference model, after which the project model can be made organization-specific. In project models, it is also possible to define business function variants representing different ways of accomplishing a business function. For these variants, optimization relationships can be defined, which represent the recommended paths that must be followed when switching from one way of working to a more optimized manner. The business function models and business process models of the project models are built by copying functions and processes from the repository in which these components were predefined. Figure 1-2 shows the relationships between the three business objects of the Enterprise Modeler module. Lines 1 through 3 show the described order. Line 4 shows an option which is used if a newly created project model describes the best-practice situation within a certain organization typology so accurately that the project model can be used as a reference model in the future.
1 Reference models consist of a number of components available in the repository (as specified in the Master Data business object).
2 Project models are often based on reference models.
3 Project models consist of a number of components available in the repository (either newly included or indirectly by means of the reference model).
4 Reference models can be based on project models.

I hope it will put some light on it.
Nishant
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