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Comic for June 20, 2019

Dilbert - June 21, 2019 - 12:59am
Categories: Geek

Using CRISPR To Resurrect the Dead

Slashdot - 21 min 49 sec ago
Categories: Geek, Opinion

Dealmaster: A bunch of Logitech PC accessories are on sale today

Ars Technica - 1 hour 6 min ago

Enlarge (credit: Ars Technica)

Greetings, Arsians! The Dealmaster is back with another round of deals to share. Today's list is headlined by a sweeping set of discounts on Logitech mice, headsets, and other PC accessories, which Amazon is featuring as part of its one-day Gold Box sale.

The catch here is that most of the items on offer aren't the absolute newest model in Logitech's respective product lines. Instead of the wireless MX Master 2S mouse, for instance, the MX Master is discounted. Instead of the newer MX Ergo trackball mouse, you get the M570. We'd also caution against many of the gaming headsets included in the sale, as we've used other models that both sound better and are less bulky.

Still, much of what's available here is worth owning, particularly when the majority of it is at genuinely discounted prices. The G203 Prodigy, for instance, doesn't have as sensitive a sensor as a pricier gaming mouse, but for $20, it's comfortable, normal-looking (a compliment for gaming mice), and high-performing enough. The C615 webcam is good value for 1080p video at $26, while the aforementioned M570 is simple but still effective for those interested in trackball mice.

Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Printing vaccines at the pharmacy or at home will be the way of the future

Ars Technica - 1 hour 11 min ago

Enlarge / Artist's impression of a vaccine printer. (credit: Getty / Aurich Lawson)

We're running a series of companion posts this week to accompany our special edition Ars Lunch Break podcast. This is the third of three guest posts centered around Rob Reid's TED talk from Tuesday. Today, microbiologist Andrew Hessel weighs in with his opinions and recommendations about the future of biomanufacturing.

The US government doesn’t skimp on bio-preparedness. Vaccines and other countermeasures are carefully developed in anticipation of disease outbreaks or bioterrorist attacks. The Strategic National Stockpile maintains a hefty inventory of medicines, supplies, and equipment, which can be shipped almost anywhere within 12 hours. In situations ranging from the 2001 anthrax attacks to 2016’s Zika scare, Americans have been lucky to have strong biodefenses.

But as anti-vaccine hysteria allows measles to regain long-lost beachheads, we’re reminded that human folly is a dynamic element of the disease landscape. Meanwhile, the number of human actors and actions in a position to stir the pot is set to explode. Tremendous improvements in core bioengineering technologies are tearing down the technical and economic barriers that once prevented the development of "designer" viruses and bacteria. Those entrusted with our defense will inevitably face an even more chaotic battlefield than exists today.

Read 17 remaining paragraphs | Comments

28 years later, a no-disc version of the Sega CD finally exists—and it works

Ars Technica - 1 hour 26 min ago

It's a great time to play old video games on modern TVs. Fan-favorite companies are taking emulation seriously with products like the NES Classic and the upcoming Sega Genesis Mini, while enthusiasts are filling in the gaps to either upgrade original consoles' connectors or rebuild them as "hardware-emulated" FPGA systems.

This week, however, we saw arguably the first big product to fill in one major underserved niche: the early '90s CD add-on adapter. Specifically, the Sega CD has received new life in the form of the MegaSD. This combination flash drive and FPGA board plugs into original Genesis and Mega Drive consoles (and the newer Analogue Mega Sg). It replicates the original Sega CD's functions without requiring a laser-driven disc drive while also remaining compatible with that add-on's peculiar system-communication style.

I was originally hesitant to write up the MegaSD's announcement—especially since it comes from relatively unknown flash card manufacturer TerraOnion as opposed to Sega, and it costs a whopping €232 (roughly $261 USD). But my tune changed upon seeing its first hands-on review from YouTube channel RetroRGB (embedded at the end of this article). In short: It appears to work exactly as advertised, complete with reduced CD-based loading times, identical gameplay, nearly identical CD-based audio, and some other nice-to-have features.

Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments


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