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How big is your Baan-DB (just Data AND Indexes)
0 - 200 GB
18%
200 - 500 GB
29%
500 - 800 GB
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1200 - 1500 GB
8%
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12%
> 2000 GB
23%
Total votes: 65

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Comic for May 20, 2019

Dilbert - May 21, 2019 - 12:59am
Categories: Geek

Linux Distros Without Systemd (2019)

Slashdot - 1 hour 22 min ago
Categories: Geek, Opinion

Ford Will Cut 7,000 White-Collar Jobs

Slashdot - 1 hour 22 min ago
Categories: Geek, Opinion

Is The Global Internet Disintegrating?

Slashdot - 1 hour 22 min ago
Categories: Geek, Opinion

A disillusioned Aaron Paul longs for someone “real” in Westworld S3 trailer

Ars Technica - 2 hours 19 min ago

HBO released the first teaser for Westworld season 3 right before last night's Game of Thrones finale.

HBO took advantage of the record number of viewers tuning in to the Game of Thrones finale last night to release the first teaser for season three of Westworld. The teaser is deliberately vague on details, but it looks like we're in for a dystopian near-future scenario set not in the original theme park but in the real outside world.

(Some spoilers for first two seasons below.)

If you're new to the series, the titular Westworld is one of six immersive theme parks owned and operated by a company called Delos Inc. It's essentially Live Action Role Play (LARP-ing) combined with a choose-your-own-adventure experience. The park is populated with a "cast" of very human-looking androids, called hosts, who follow a bunch of intertwining narratives, rebooting the same narrative every day. The park's well-heeled visitors can pretty much do whatever they like to the hosts—rape, pillage, torture, murder—and they do so more often than not, because they don't see the hosts as anything more than unfeeling props in their private dramas.

Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Baltimore ransomware nightmare could last weeks more, with big consequences

Ars Technica - 4 hours 19 min ago

Enlarge / Days after Mayor "Jack" Young took over for disgraced Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh, ransomware took down Baltimore City's networks. It may be weeks or months before things return to normal—and "normal" wasn't that great, either, based on the city's IT track record. (credit: Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images)

It's been nearly two weeks since the City of Baltimore's networks were shut down in response to a ransomware attack, and there's still no end in sight to the attack's impact. It may be weeks more before the city's services return to something resembling normal—manual workarounds are being put in place to handle some services now, but the city's water billing and other payment systems remain offline, as well as most of the city's email and much of the government's phone systems.

The ransomware attack came in the midst of a major transition at City Hall. Mayor Bernard C. “Jack” Young assumed office officially just days before the attack, after the resignation of former mayor Catherine Pugh, who is facing an ever-expanding corruption investigation. And some of the mayor's critical staff positions remained unfilled—the mayor's deputy chief of staff for operations, Sheryl Goldstein, starts work today.

To top it off, unlike the City of Atlanta—which suffered from a Samsam ransomware attack in March of 2018—Baltimore has no insurance to cover the cost of a cyber attack. So the cost of cleaning up the RobbinHood ransomware, which will far exceed the approximately $70,000 the ransomware operators demanded, will be borne entirely by Baltimore's citizens.

Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments


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