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0 - 200 GB
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> 2000 GB
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Total votes: 54

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Comic for March 19, 2019

Dilbert - 0 sec ago
Categories: Geek

Kickstarter's Staff Is Unionizing

Slashdot - March 19, 2019 - 11:45pm
Categories: Geek, Opinion

The Most Powerful iMac Pro Now Costs $15,927

Slashdot - March 19, 2019 - 11:45pm
Categories: Geek, Opinion

Nvidia expanding DirectX raytracing to GeForce 10, 16 series cards

Ars Technica - March 19, 2019 - 10:35pm

Enlarge / A screenshot of Metro Exodus with raytracing enabled. (credit: Nvidia)

Microsoft announced DirectX raytracing a year ago, promising to bring hardware-accelerated raytraced graphics to PC gaming. In August, Nvidia announced its RTX 2080 and 2080Ti, a pair of new video cards with the company's new Turing RTX processors. In addition to the regular graphics-processing hardware, these new chips included two extra sets of additional cores, one set designed for running machine-learning algorithms and the other for computing raytraced graphics. These cards were the first, and currently only, cards to support DirectX Raytracing (DXR).

That's going to change in April, as Nvidia has announced that 10-series and 16-series cards will be getting some amount of raytracing support with next month's driver update. Specifically, we're talking about 10-series cards built with Pascal chips (that's the 1060 6GB or higher), Titan-branded cards with Pascal or Volta chips (the Titan X, XP, and V), and 16-series cards with Turing chips (Turing, in contrast to the Turing RTX, lacks the extra cores for raytracing and machine learning).

The GTX 1060 6GB and above should start supporting DXR with next month's Nvidia driver update. (credit: Nvidia)

Unsurprisingly, the performance of these cards will not match that of the RTX chips. RTX chips use both their raytracing cores and their machine-learning cores for DXR graphics. To achieve a suitable level of performance, the raytracing simulates relatively few light rays and uses machine-learning-based antialiasing to flesh out the raytraced images. Absent the dedicated hardware, DXR on the GTX chips will use 32-bit integer operations on the CUDA cores already used for computation and shader workloads.

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“Severe” ransomware attack cripples big aluminum producer

Ars Technica - March 19, 2019 - 9:46pm

Enlarge / Notes posted on a window of Norsk Hydro's headquarters in Norway on March 19, 2019. (credit: Getty Images)

One of the world’s biggest producers of aluminum has been hit by a serious ransomware attack that shut down its worldwide network, stopped or disrupted plants, and sent IT workers scrambling to return operations to normal.

Norsk Hydro of Norway said the malware first hit computers in the United States on Monday night. By Tuesday morning, the infection had spread to other parts of the company, which operates in 40 countries. Company officials responded by isolating plants to prevent further spreading. Some plants were temporarily stopped, while others, which had to be kept running continuously, were switched to manual mode when possible. The company’s 35,000 employees were instructed to keep computers turned off but were allowed to use phones and tablets to check email.

“Let me be clear: the situation for Norsk Hydro through this is quite severe,” Chief Financial Officer Eivind Kallevik said during a press conference Tuesday. “The entire worldwide network is down, affecting our production as well as our office operations. We are working hard to contain and solve this situation and to ensure the safety and security of our employees. Our main priority now is to ensure safe operations and limit the operational and financial impact.”

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