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Poll
How big is your Baan-DB (just Data AND Indexes)
0 - 200 GB
15%
200 - 500 GB
28%
500 - 800 GB
4%
800 - 1200 GB
9%
1200 - 1500 GB
9%
1500 - 2000 GB
13%
> 2000 GB
22%
Total votes: 46

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Are We Ready For 5G Phones?

Slashdot - 50 min 56 sec ago
Categories: Geek, Opinion

Nestle and Epic pull YouTube ads over abuse claims

BBC Technology News - 1 hour 35 min ago
Several big firms pull ads after they appear next to sexualised comments left on children's videos.

Comic for February 20, 2019

Dilbert - 1 hour 35 min ago
Categories: Geek

Dreams will finally launch this Spring on PS4 for $30—in “limited early access”

Ars Technica - 1 hour 40 min ago

Enlarge / This Spring, Media Molecule's latest "play, create, share" game could be yours... once we figure out what they mean by "limited early access." (credit: Media Molecule)

Dreams, the first major PS4 exclusive from longtime PlayStation developer Media Molecule, is finally almost here. But if you think its protracted development cycle is anywhere near over, think again.

PlayStation Blog has the news today: starting "this Spring," gamers will be able to buy the latest "play, create, share" title from the makers of LittleBigPlanet for $29.99 ($39.99CDN in Canada, €29.99 in Europe). But there's a catch: this version of the game will be given a loud "early access" label, a rarity on the PlayStation Store.

"If you participated in the [closed] beta and felt like Dreams wasn’t fully featured enough for you yet, or you wanted more Media Molecule game content, then Early Access might not be for you," Media Molecule director Siobhan Reddy wrote on Wednesday. The sales pitch seems targeted at excited content creators who are ready to dive into the game, even without a full-fledged "campaign" mode or finalized UI and tutorials.

Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

US sues contractor for allegedly over-billing on now-defunct MOX fuel facility

Ars Technica - 1 hour 55 min ago

Enlarge / Construction at the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility before the project was stopped. (credit: MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility)

Last week, the US Department of Justice (DOJ) filed a complaint against a company called CB&I Areva MOX Services and its subcontractor, Wise Services, for allegedly billing the US government for supplies that were never delivered. According to the complaint, a manager at Wise offered kickbacks including football tickets, guns, a YETI cooler, and a television to receive preferential treatment on a US government project to build a nuclear fuel reforming facility.

MOX Services was contracted by the United States National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to build the Mixed Oxides Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF), which would have repurposed weapons-grade plutonium as fuel for nuclear reactors in the United States.

After wasting more than $7.6 billion on the MFFF, the US Department of Energy (DOE) canceled work on the South Carolina facility. The department has been quietly moving plutonium out of the area since then.

Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Microsoft culls secret Flash whitelist after Google points out its insecurity

Ars Technica - 2 hours 10 min ago

Enlarge (credit: Aurich Lawson)

In 2017, Microsoft changed its Edge browser so that Flash content would be click-to-run (or disabled outright) on virtually every site on the Web. A handful of sites were to be whitelisted, however, due to a combination of Flash dependence and high popularity.

The whitelist was intended to make it easier to move to a world using HTML5 for rich interactive content and to limit the impact of any future Flash vulnerabilities. At the same time, the list would still allow sites with complex Flash-dependent content to keep on running. If only a few trusted sites can run Flash content by default, it should be much harder for bad actors to take advantage of Flash flaws. A similar approach was adopted by other browsers; Google, for example, whitelisted the top-10 Flash-using sites for one year after switching Chrome to "click-to-run."

But Google figured out how Edge's whitelist worked (via ZDNet) and found that its implementation left something to be desired. The list of 58 sites (56 of which have been identified by Google) including some that were unsurprising; many of the entries are sites with considerable numbers of Flash games, including Facebook. Others seemed more peculiar; a Spanish hair salon, for example, was listed.

Read 2 remaining paragraphs | Comments


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