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Comic for December 18, 2018

Dilbert - December 19, 2018 - 12:59am
Categories: Geek

Google Chrome wants to stop back-button hijacking

Ars Technica - 45 min 18 sec ago

Enlarge (credit: Google)

Have you ever been to a website where the back button just doesn't work? In these instances, you press "back" to go back but instead you just end up at the same page where you started. A new commit on the Chromium source (first spotted by 9to5Google) outlines a plan to stop weird website schemes like this, with a lockdown on "history manipulation" by websites. The commit reads: "Entries that are added to the back/forward list without the user's intention are marked to be skipped on subsequent back button invocations."

The back button moves backward through your Web history, and, along with the close button, it's one of the most common ways of leaving a website. This is very bad if you're a shady website designer, and sites have tried to mess with the back button by adding extra entries to your Web history. It's not hard to do this with a redirect—imagine loading example1.com from a search result, which instantly redirects you to example2.com. Both pages would get stored in your history, so pressing "back" from example2.com would send you to example1.com, which would redirect you again and add more troublesome history entries. This doesn't make it impossible to leave (quickly hitting the back button twice might work), but it does make it harder to leave, which is the end goal.

To stop this kind of history manipulation, bad history entries will soon get a "skippable" flag, which means the back button will ignore them when it navigates through the history order. One commit says Google still needs to come up with some kind of "pruning logic" to declare a website as skippable, but that could probably be done with something like a timestamp. You spent zero seconds on that redirect page, so that's probably not a good history entry.

Read 1 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Kroger-owned grocery store begins fully driverless deliveries

Ars Technica - 49 min 10 sec ago

Nuro, a startup founded by two veterans of Google's self-driving car project, has reached an important milestone: it has started making fully autonomous grocery deliveries on public streets.

Fry's Food, a brand owned by grocery giant Kroger, launched a self-driving grocery delivery program back in August in partnership with Nuro. Fry's has been using Nuro cars to deliver groceries to customers near one of its stores on East McDowell Road in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Initially, these deliveries were made by Toyota Priuses that Nuro had outfitted with its sensors and software. There were also safety drivers behind the wheel. Nuro says it has made 1,000 deliveries using these vehicles since August.

Read 8 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Chilling Adventures of Sabrina charms with some welcome holiday horror

Ars Technica - 52 min 49 sec ago

Enlarge / Sabrina Spellman (Kiernan Shipka) toasts friends and family at the witchy winter solstice in The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina holiday special. (credit: Netflix)

Looking for a palate cleanser after all those wholesome Christmas movies saturating every TV channel? We recommend "A Midwinter's Tale," a special holiday episode of the Netflix horror series The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina. It caps off a strong first season for the fledgling series. And Sabrina has just been renewed for a third and fourth season (16 episodes in total), which means we'll get even more sinister witchy goodness in the future.

The series is based on the comic book series of the same name, part of the Archie Horror imprint, and it's much, much darker in tone than the original Sabrina the Teenaged Witch comics. Originally intended as a companion series to the CW's Riverdale—a gleefully Gothic take on the original Archie comic books—Sabrina ended up on Netflix instead. It's a stronger series for it, evidenced by rave reviews and a rapidly expanding fan base.

(Some spoilers for season 1 below.)

Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Tumblr Porn Vanishes Today

Slashdot - 1 hour 23 min ago
Categories: Geek, Opinion

Ofcom: More spectrum for all the good boys and girls. Except you, EE. You've had your fill

The Register - 1 hour 27 min ago
UK mobile networks had better open their wallets

Ofcom has revealed plans to offer more of the airwaves to mobile networks, increasing capacity by around 22 per cent overall, and by 62 per cent in the more attractive sub-1GHz portion of the spectrum.…


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