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Comic for December 17, 2018

Dilbert - December 18, 2018 - 12:59am
Categories: Geek

Archaeologists reconstruct pre-Columbian temple with 3D-printed blocks

Ars Technica - 1 hour 11 min ago

Enlarge (credit: Brattarb via Wikimedia Commons)

The unfinished temple in a southern valley of the Lake Titicaca Basin in modern-day Bolivia has been a mystery for at least 500 years. Now known as the Pumapunku—"Door of the Jaguar" in the Quechua language—the complex stone structure is part of a sprawling complex of pyramids, plazas, and platforms built by a pre-Columbian culture we now call the Tiwanaku. Construction began around 500 CE and proceeded off and on, in phases, over the next few centuries until the Tiwanaku left the site around 900 or 1000 CE.

When the Inca Empire rose around 1200 CE, they claimed the sprawling ceremonial complex as the site of the world's creation, although they didn't finish the Tiwanaku's temple.

Old school and high tech

Spanish visitors in the 1500s and 1600s describe “a wondrous, though unfinished, building” with walls of H-shaped andesite pieces and massive gateways and windows carved from single blocks. These were set on remarkably smooth sandstone slabs, some of which weighed more than 80 tons. But after centuries of looting, the stones of the Pumapunku are so scattered that not one lies in its original place. The Tiwanaku left behind no written documents or plans to help modern researchers understand what their buildings looked like or what purpose they served.

Read 14 remaining paragraphs | Comments

The Decline of American Peyote

Slashdot - 1 hour 17 min ago
Categories: Geek, Opinion

Sony inadvertently leaks player counts for PS4 titles

Ars Technica - 1 hour 29 min ago

Enlarge

Here at Ars, we have a longstanding obsession with revealing the hidden numbers in the secretive world of video game sales and gameplay data. So we were intrigued this weekend when we heard that Sony seems to have inadvertently revealed the total number of players for a large majority of the PS4's library.

The leak centers on Sony's recent My PS4 Life promotion, which lets users generate a personalized statistics video for their PSN Gamertag. Amid some aggregate statistics and "total hours played" numbers for your favorite games, the video also lists your "rarest" trophy and, crucially, the precise number of PSN users who have earned that trophy.

Sony has long made public the percentage of a game's players that have earned any specific trophy on PSN (rounded to the nearest tenth of a percent). Combining that percentage with the "My PS4 Life" numbers, that makes it relatively simple to reverse-engineer an overall "players" estimate for that game.

Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Ford built a noise-canceling kennel to placate your pup - Roadshow

cNET.com - News - 1 hour 36 min ago
It uses the same kind of tech found in headphones and cars.

I was wrong about the Motorola Razr - CNET

cNET.com - News - 1 hour 46 min ago
Long before the iPhone or the Galaxy line, this phone was all the rage. And I failed to see just how popular the Razr would be.

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