Baanboard.com

Go Back   Baanboard.com > News

User login

Frontpage Sponsor

Main

Poll
For ERP LN feature pack upgrade, what method of install are you using?
Installation Wizard into existing VRC
37%
Installation Wizard into new VRC
39%
Manual into existing VRC
3%
Manual into new VRC
21%
Total votes: 38

Baanboard at LinkedIn


Reference Content

 
RSS Newsfeeds

Intel Xeon chips rebranded to sound like credit cards

CIO.com - News - May 4, 2017 - 10:02pm

After about half a decade, Intel is wiping the confusing E5 and E7 monikers off its Xeon chips and rebranding them to bring more clarity about the performance and features that come with the processors.

Xeon chips are used in servers and workstations like Mac Pro. Xeon chips being released mid-year will be broken down into Platinum, Gold, Silver, and Bronze processors.

The naming scheme -- derived from metals -- is a mix of Olympic medals and branding of credit cards from companies like Delta. A person familiar with Intel's plans earlier said the chips will likely be widely referred to as Xeon-P, Xeon-G, Xeon-S, and Xeon-B, with the P for Platinum, G for Gold, etc.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

Data scientists compete to create cancer-detection algorithms

CIO.com - IT industry - May 4, 2017 - 9:23pm

Data scientists are using machine learning to tackle lung cancer detection. Beginning in January, nearly 10,000 data scientists around the world competed in the Data Science Bowl to develop the most effective algorithm to help medical professionals detect lung cancer earlier and with better accuracy.

[ Analytics 50: Call for 2017 entries ]

In 2010, the National Lung Screening Trial showed that annual screening with low-dose computed tomography (CT) — a scanner that uses computer-processed combinations of many X-ray images from different angles to generate high-contrast 3D images — could reduce lung cancer deaths by 20 percent. While a breakthrough for early detection, the technology has also resulted in a relatively high rate of false positives compared with more traditional X-rays.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

How Brexit helped Credit Suisse prove the value of AppDynamics' monitoring tools

CIO.com - News - May 4, 2017 - 9:20pm

AppDynamics' application monitoring tools played an important role in ensuring that Credit Suisse's FX trading platform was able to handle the market price fluctuations brought about by the UK Brexit vote, just two weeks after a major outage took its systems offline.

The Swiss financial services firm conducted its 'proof of value' (PoV) of the AppDynamics tools in the run up to the EU referendum, and the increased financial market volatility helped prove the return on investment immediately.

When it comes to silver linings, this is a pretty thin one, but the Swiss firm isn't renowned for its risk taking, and the speed with which it adopted the app monitoring system following a trial process is an indication of how the software impressed upper management.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

IDG Contributor Network: Is data for good really that good?

CIO.com - Opinion - May 4, 2017 - 9:18pm

Sometimes you look at the world and you just want to have a good cry. Other times you decide you have to do something.

Grass-roots goodwill efforts have been around ever since the Good Samaritan hauled a stranger out of the road, proving that upper body strength could be effective currency back in the day. Giving is satisfying. But grass-roots goodwill efforts don’t always scale.

For instance, imagine if three carpenters agreed to help an underprivileged family repair their rundown house. In reality, the family needs carpenter, a plumber and an electrician. The talents of two of the carpenters would be wasted.

Now imagine if Habitat for Humanity decides to help five families with new housing. Habitat can organize carpentry, electrical and plumbing resources, clustering the work by neighborhood and optimizing where and when repairs are done to ensure that talent is available. Efficient use of resources is proportional to the resulting benefits. 

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

Cloud can ease burden of data protection compliance, Google execs say

CIO.com - News - May 4, 2017 - 9:06pm

The EU's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is fast approaching but with significant resource investment required, many organisations are struggling to meet the May 2018 deadline. According to Google executives, moving data to the cloud will help take some of the pain out of upgrading security practices and data protection standards in line with the regulations.

GDPR is the biggest change to data protection regulations in two decades, and is a major challenge for many businesses. A survey from analyst firm Gartner released yesterday showed that around half of those affected by the legislation - whether in the EU or outside - will not be in full compliance when the regulations take effect.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

Microsoft asks Windows 10 Enterprise customers to test new anti-exploit tech

CIO.com - News - May 4, 2017 - 8:58pm

Microsoft today asked enterprise customers to test a new anti-malware, anti-exploit technology in Windows 10's baked-in browser.

Windows 10's latest preview, tagged as build 16188 and released Thursday, includes Windows Defender Application Guard, a virtualization-based feature that isolates the contents of a tab in Edge, the OS's default browser, from the rest of the system.

[ Further reading: Fighting ransomware: A fresh look at Windows Server approaches ]

While Application Guard was announced in September, and went through limited testing in the months since, today marked its first appearance to all Insiders running Windows 10 Enterprise. Users must manually toggle on Application Guard from a setting dialog, then open a tab within Edge by selecting "New Application Guard Window" from the browser's menu.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

China adds a quantum computer to high-performance computing arsenal

CIO.com - News - May 4, 2017 - 8:02pm

China already has the world's fastest supercomputer and has now built a crude quantum computer that could outpace today's PCs and servers.

Quantum computers have already been built by companies like IBM and D-Wave, but Chinese researchers have taken a different approach. They are introducing quantum computing using multiple photons, which could provide a superior way to calculate compared to today's computers. 

The Chinese quantum computing architecture allows for five-photon sampling and entanglement. It's an improvement over previous experiments involving single-photon sourcing, up to 24,000 times faster, the researchers claimed.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

IDG Contributor Network: Is blockchain technology secure for your company’s transactions?

CIO.com - IT industry - May 4, 2017 - 8:00pm

Blockchain technology is hard to ignore as practically everybody’s talking about it. That’s understandable because it’s predicted to disrupt the value flows that underpin business transactions and economies as well as create new business models. It has enormous power to solve business problems. But is a blockchain “distributed ledger” secure?

Blockchain is still in its infancy, so company leaders are naturally concerned about whether it can be manipulated. Organizations worldwide are seeking to take advantage of the new opportunities and disruptive power of blockchain — organizations that understand the magnitude of potential security issues. It has been rigorously tested in pilots and at scale by many governments, institutions and companies that have found the technology is incredibly secure.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: Is blockchain technology secure for your company’s transactions?

CIO.com - Opinion - May 4, 2017 - 8:00pm

Blockchain technology is hard to ignore as practically everybody’s talking about it. That’s understandable because it’s predicted to disrupt the value flows that underpin business transactions and economies as well as create new business models. It has enormous power to solve business problems. But is a blockchain “distributed ledger” secure?

Blockchain is still in its infancy, so company leaders are naturally concerned about whether it can be manipulated. Organizations worldwide are seeking to take advantage of the new opportunities and disruptive power of blockchain — organizations that understand the magnitude of potential security issues. It has been rigorously tested in pilots and at scale by many governments, institutions and companies that have found the technology is incredibly secure.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

Financial cybercrime group abuses Windows app compatibility feature

CIO.com - News - May 4, 2017 - 7:05pm

When Microsoft made it possible for enterprises to quickly resolve incompatibilities between their applications and new Windows versions, it didn't intend to help malware authors as well. Yet, this feature is now abused by cybercriminals for stealthy and persistent malware infections.

The Windows Application Compatibility Infrastructure allows companies and application developers to create patches, known as shims. These consist of libraries that sit between applications and the OS and rewrite API calls and other attributes so that those programs can run well on newer versions of Windows.

Shims are temporary fixes that can make older programs work even if Microsoft changes how Windows does certain things under the hood. They can be deployed to computers through Group Policy and are loaded when the target applications start.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

AppDynamics explains logic behind that $3.7 billion Cisco acquisition

CIO.com - News - May 4, 2017 - 6:46pm

Following a $3.7 billion acquisition, AppDynamics is already looking to access Cisco's enterprise customer network as it plans to keep up the pace with the big hitters in the new wave of enterprise software vendors.

Cisco completed the acquisition of AppDynamics in March this year for a reported $3.7 billion (£2.86 billion), nearly double its pre-IPO unicorn valuation of $1.9 billion (£1.47 billion).

Speaking at the AppD Summit in London recently, CEO David Wadhwani said that the primary reason for the acquisition from Cisco's side was its belief in the underlying streaming data model that had been built at AppDynamics, not just in how it could help Cisco, but in its ability to further penetrate the enterprise market.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

All times are GMT +2. The time now is 14:58.


©2001-2017 - Baanboard.com - Baanforums.com