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For ERP LN feature pack upgrade, what method of install are you using?
Installation Wizard into existing VRC
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Manual into new VRC
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Total votes: 49

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IDG Contributor Network: Two ITIL processes that will protect your existence

CIO.com - Infrastructure - June 9, 2017 - 5:30pm

In my recent blog entry, I talked about the future of the traditional IT organization and the need for sound governance and processes in the implementation of IT solutions, especially if they are leveraged through cloud and outsourced solution suppliers.

IT service management (ITSM) and IT infrastructure library (ITIL) have become the dominant approach and best practices for operational excellence in most IT organizations. Yet, I question why so many have implemented only four or five of the 26 defined ITIL 2011 processes given the strength and magnitude of guidance that the ITIL IT service lifecycle provides.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: Two ITIL processes that will protect your existence

CIO.com - Infrastructure - June 9, 2017 - 5:30pm
IT service management (ITSM) and IT infrastructure library (ITIL) have become the dominant approach and best practices for operational excellence in most IT organizations. Yet, I question why many organizations have implemented only 4 or 5 of the 26 defined ITIL 2011 best-practice processes given the strength and magnitude of guidance in the ITIL IT service life cycle. The front and back door of an IT organization is managing customers and suppliers so, even if you aren’t quite ready to build the IT organization of the future, these practices are equally as important as the more commonly implemented processes of change management and incident management.

IDG Contributor Network: Finance disrupted, tech it or leave it

CIO.com - Opinion - June 9, 2017 - 3:00pm

Software is disrupting (eating?) our world. That’s something that has been going on for quite a while now at the scale of our fast-changing world. As the tech industry is leading our economic growth, there is something that many of us do not realize about these “tech companies.”

Amazon is not a tech company but a retail one, Facebook is not a tech company but a media one, Lyft is not a tech company but a transportation one…

“Tech companies” used to operate only within the space of slow, basic, bulky electronics and personal computers. But with the rise of Internet, they became much more than this. Software innovation is the engine that is powering the next generation of successful companies. And obviously, the finance world is not exempt of this disruption.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

IDG Contributor Network: Stay out of security breach headlines: 3 things that must be addressed in your cloud agreement

CIO.com - Opinion - June 9, 2017 - 1:43pm

It seems like you can’t go a day without reading a headline regarding yet another high-profile mass data and security breach. Security and data breaches are a concern for corporations, universities, individual consumers, and even the US government. Some recent examples making headlines include Chipotle, Kmart, Zomato, as well as OneLogin, and if you are not aware, there are concerns over Russia’s military intelligence executing a cyberattack on at least one U.S. voting software supplier.

There is no question the risk of security and data breaches must be considered an extremely serious matter and remain top of mind at the executive and board levels within all organizations.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

IDG Contributor Network: How big data is transforming the automotive industry

CIO.com - IT industry - June 9, 2017 - 1:42pm

The rapidly expanding Internet of Things (IoT) is seeing more and more devices connected to the internet. Traditionally, these have been biometric wearables, home appliances and audio-visual equipment. Automobile manufacturers, however, are making a play to corner this market for their own ends.

Entrenching Wi-Fi into automobiles opens an entirely new avenue of pursuit that entails vehicles communicating directly with the internet for GPS navigation, email and music streaming, for example.

By 2020, the connected car market report states that connected car services will account for approximately $40 billion annually. These services include infotainment, navigation, fleet management, remote diagnostics, automatic collision notification, enhanced safety, usage based insurance, traffic management and, lastly, autonomous driving. The root of these applications is big data, as increasing amounts of data are collected from remote sensors; this information is being interpreted and leveraged to transform the automotive industry into one of automation and self-sufficiency.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: How big data is transforming the automotive industry

CIO.com - Opinion - June 9, 2017 - 1:42pm

The rapidly expanding Internet of Things (IoT) is seeing more and more devices connected to the internet. Traditionally, these have been biometric wearables, home appliances and audio-visual equipment. Automobile manufacturers, however, are making a play to corner this market for their own ends.

Entrenching Wi-Fi into automobiles opens an entirely new avenue of pursuit that entails vehicles communicating directly with the internet for GPS navigation, email and music streaming, for example.

By 2020, the connected car market report states that connected car services will account for approximately $40 billion annually. These services include infotainment, navigation, fleet management, remote diagnostics, automatic collision notification, enhanced safety, usage based insurance, traffic management and, lastly, autonomous driving. The root of these applications is big data, as increasing amounts of data are collected from remote sensors; this information is being interpreted and leveraged to transform the automotive industry into one of automation and self-sufficiency.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

SoftBank targets service industries with new robotics acquisition

CIO.com - News - June 9, 2017 - 1:24pm

SoftBank's latest robotics acquisition could allow it to open up a whole new market for service industries and home help.

Its customer service and companion robot, Pepper, is somewhat limited by the fact that it can't do much more than wave its arms and talk.

Now, though, SoftBank has its eyes on the fetching and carrying capabilities of BigDog and Spot, the dog-sized pack robots developed by Boston Robotics.

SoftBank, originally an ISP and mobile network operator, moved into robotics in 2014 when it bought Aldebaran, the French company behind the diminutive humanoid robots Pepper and Nao.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

SoftBank targets service industries with Boston Robotics acquisition

CIO.com - News - June 9, 2017 - 1:24pm

SoftBank's latest robotics acquisition could allow it to open up a whole new market for service industries and home help.

Its customer service and companion robot, Pepper, is somewhat limited by the fact that it can't do much more than wave its arms and talk.

Now, though, SoftBank has its eyes on the fetching and carrying capabilities of BigDog and Spot, the dog-sized pack robots developed by Boston Robotics.

SoftBank, originally an ISP and mobile network operator, moved into robotics in 2014 when it bought Aldebaran, the French company behind the diminutive humanoid robots Pepper and Nao.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

SoftBank targets service industries with Boston Robotics acquisition

CIO.com - News - June 9, 2017 - 1:24pm

SoftBank's latest robotics acquisition could allow it to open up a whole new market for service industries and home help.

Its customer service and companion robot, Pepper, is somewhat limited by the fact that it can't do much more than wave its arms and talk.

Now, though, SoftBank has its eyes on the fetching and carrying capabilities of BigDog and Spot, the dog-sized pack robots developed by Boston Robotics.

SoftBank, originally an ISP and mobile network operator, moved into robotics in 2014 when it bought Aldebaran, the French company behind the diminutive humanoid robots Pepper and Nao.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

CFO or CEO: To whom should IT report?

CIO.com - Opinion - June 9, 2017 - 12:00pm

In a recent survey of midmarket CIOs and IT executives, nearly half said they report directly to the CEO, while 23 percent report to the CFO. 

CIOs are less frequently tasked with traditional technology management functions such as systems and infrastructure, rather their time is spent on growth strategies and developing stakeholder relationships.

So, how does organizational reporting structure affect a CIO’s ability to negotiate for budget and enable them to leverage the latest technology that help their midmarket company stay ahead of industry competition?

A direct line to the top

While a direct reporting line to the CEO typically equates to increased visibility, stronger sponsorship of efforts and a better overall collaborative environment, Joel Wolfe, vice president and CIO at J.W. Energy in Addison, Texas, said a couple of key variables can significantly affect the process regardless of reporting lines. 

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

IDG Contributor Network: Why chatbots may be the glue that holds IoT together

CIO.com - Opinion - June 8, 2017 - 7:55pm

As smart as today’s conversational interfaces appear to be, when Alexa can’t distinguish what the word “it” refers to in a sentence, how valuable is she really?

Chatbots should be more than a party trick; and at this stage, many of their use cases leave much to be desired. But repairing their conversational shortcomings could create value where we never thought possible, and potentially be the engine that drives the IoT landscape forward.

The Key to Conversation: Context

Machines don’t understand context the way humans do, and solving this problem is the next step towards creating an interface that’s truly conversational. Luckily, progress in machine learning and natural language processing is giving new meaning to “conversational” devices. My colleague Katherine Bailey, Principal Data Scientist at Acquia, wrote an article recently about conversational AI and the road ahead. She talked about a machine learning technique called Word Embeddings, where vectors are used to represent words in 300+ dimensions, which introduces context into artificially intelligent systems. This technique is maturing, and conversational interfaces are getting smarter the more you speak to them. They can learn and categorize human language through experience, making them that much more useful for consumers.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

IDG Contributor Network: Data center automation and the software-defined database

CIO.com - Opinion - June 8, 2017 - 7:43pm

If you take a step back for a moment and think about airplane flight, it turns out that something rather extraordinary is happening. Most of the time the plane is being flown by an autopilot and the pilot is actually kind of a “meta pilot” - a minder that watches to ensure that the autopilot is not doing anything dumb. And every year, millions of us entrust our lives to this system - we’re not only okay with it, we’re in fact impressed that an auto-pilot can do that stuff so effectively. Against that backdrop, now consider how extraordinary it is that we don’t have computer software that can “fly” a data-center. Don’t bet that it will stay that way. It is changing, and the changes are going to have big consequences.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

USDA-RMA CIO: For digital transformation to succeed, remove fear

CIO.com - Business Analytics - June 8, 2017 - 7:18pm

In the 1930s, a combination of severe drought, over-plowing, wind erosion and unsustainable farming methods led to the massive dust storms—known as "black blizzards" or "dusters"—that defined the Dust Bowl. Congress authorized the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation (FCIC) as part of President Roosevelt’s New Deal to help sustain the agricultural sector by providing farmers with crop insurance.

Today, the FCIC is maintained under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Risk Management Agency (USDA-RMA), and CIO Chad Sheridan acknowledges the historical legacy of the agency while working diligently to digitally transform for the future. 

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: ERP

USDA-RMA CIO: For digital transformation to succeed, remove fear

CIO.com - Business Analytics - June 8, 2017 - 7:18pm

In the 1930s, a combination of severe drought, over-plowing, wind erosion and unsustainable farming methods led to the massive dust storms—known as "black blizzards" or "dusters"—that defined the Dust Bowl. Congress authorized the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation (FCIC) as part of President Roosevelt’s New Deal to help sustain the agricultural sector by providing farmers with crop insurance.

Today, the FCIC is maintained under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Risk Management Agency (USDA-RMA), and CIO Chad Sheridan acknowledges the historical legacy of the agency while working diligently to digitally transform for the future. 

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: ERP

IDG Contributor Network: Why Google might lose the enterprise AI wars

CIO.com - Opinion - June 8, 2017 - 3:25pm

“Google has never understood enterprise,” asserts Chris Nicholson, CEO of Skymind. By contrast, Nicholson gets how businesses think. His company builds Deeplearning4j, the leading open-source enterprise-ready library for deep learning. “You can do anything you want in consumer, because people aren’t paying. In enterprise, your customers hand you eight figure checks and expect top-notch professional service along with golf games and steak dinners.”

The three current leaders in cloud computing services - Amazon (AWS), Microsoft (Azure), and IBM (IBM Cloud) - understand this dynamic very well. While Google is widely acknowledged as the defacto leader in AI research with DeepMind and Google Brain, winning the “Machine Learning As A Service” (MLaaS) wars is much harder than simply releasing free tools like TensorFlow.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

IDG Contributor Network: Why Google might lose the enterprise AI wars

CIO.com - IT industry - June 8, 2017 - 3:25pm

“Google has never understood enterprise,” asserts Chris Nicholson, CEO of Skymind. By contrast, Nicholson gets how businesses think. His company builds Deeplearning4j, the leading open-source enterprise-ready library for deep learning. “You can do anything you want in consumer, because people aren’t paying. In enterprise, your customers hand you eight figure checks and expect top-notch professional service along with golf games and steak dinners.”

The three current leaders in cloud computing services - Amazon (AWS), Microsoft (Azure), and IBM (IBM Cloud) - understand this dynamic very well. While Google is widely acknowledged as the defacto leader in AI research with DeepMind and Google Brain, winning the “Machine Learning As A Service” (MLaaS) wars is much harder than simply releasing free tools like TensorFlow.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: How to Launch a Successful Video Product Review Campaign

CIO.com - Opinion - June 8, 2017 - 3:18pm

Video content is powerful. From a marketing perspective, user-generated content is even more powerful. But if you’ve never run a user-generated video review campaign in the past, trying to start one from scratch can be a little intimidating. Thankfully, it doesn’t have to be difficult.

The Power of Video Product Reviews

The power of video as a content medium is undeniable. All you have to do is take a look at some of the different data points and statistics curated by HubSpot:

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

IDG Contributor Network: How to Launch a Successful Video Product Review Campaign

CIO.com - IT industry - June 8, 2017 - 3:18pm

Video content is powerful. From a marketing perspective, user-generated content is even more powerful. But if you’ve never run a user-generated video review campaign in the past, trying to start one from scratch can be a little intimidating. Thankfully, it doesn’t have to be difficult.

The Power of Video Product Reviews

The power of video as a content medium is undeniable. All you have to do is take a look at some of the different data points and statistics curated by HubSpot:

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: The New York Times is winning at digital

CIO.com - Opinion - June 8, 2017 - 1:00pm

Most of today’s media “success stories” are about digitally “native” companies like Google and Facebook. Meanwhile, many of the great brands of the pre-digital era seem to be struggling for mere survival in the face of digital disruption. And it’s hard to think of a media segment more threatened by digital than newspapers.  As advertisers have shifted more of their budget to web and mobile,  almost 70% of all newspaper advertising dollars have evaporated over the last 15 years.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

How CIOs can help close the gender-equity gap

CIO.com - Opinion - June 8, 2017 - 11:05am

The gender pay gap is as wide as ever. Women remain severely underrepresented and underpaid in the global workforce, earning, on average, $100 for every $140 a man earns. But we can help change this. Digital technologies may be what ultimately helps women get into work, advance and close the gender pay gap.

At Accenture, we conducted global research – Getting to Equal 2017 – which examines the challenges and opportunities in helping close the gender pay gap. We found that women graduating in 2020 from universities in developed markets could be the first generation to close the pay gap in 2044, well within their professional lifetimes.

But what role should companies—and CIOs—have in harnessing the power of digital technologies to help close the gap? Our research spanning 29 countries found three powerful “equalizers” that could help women advance in their careers, increase their income and close the pay gap.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Categories: Opinion

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