Baanboard.com

Go Back   Baanboard.com > News

User login

Frontpage Sponsor

Main

Poll
For ERP LN feature pack upgrade, what method of install are you using?
Installation Wizard into existing VRC
37%
Installation Wizard into new VRC
39%
Manual into existing VRC
3%
Manual into new VRC
21%
Total votes: 38

Baanboard at LinkedIn


Reference Content

 
RSS Newsfeeds

Tango down: Google’s first AR project officially shuts down March 1

Ars Technica - December 15, 2017 - 9:15pm

Ron Amadeo

Now that Google's newest augmented reality project, ARCore, is out and functioning, the company is ready to admit that its old augmented reality project—Tango—is dead. Google took to Twitter today to announce that Tango support would be shut down on March 1, 2018.

Tango was Google's first big augmented reality push, and it solved the problem of position tracking with lots and lots of extra hardware. Tango devices basically packed the entirety of an Xbox Kinect—an IR projector, a time-of-flight camera, and a fisheye motion camera—into the back of a smartphone. The extra sensors allowed the phone to see in full 3D, which was mostly used to bring consumers a small handful of augmented reality games. The first Project Tango device, the Lenovo Phab 2 Pro, was an expensive, slow, massive device with ugly looks and poor battery life. The second and last Tango phone to ever be released, the Asus ZenFone AR, improved on the hardware a bit, but by then the platform seemed dead.

Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Facebook's Snooze button lets you mute news feed distractions - CNET

cNET.com - News - December 15, 2017 - 9:09pm
The new feature, previously only in testing, arrives as Facebook faces criticism from former employees over social media's impact on our well-being.

Netflix is watching you. We're all watching you

ZDnet News - December 15, 2017 - 9:03pm
The video streaming giant calling out its users on Twitter is creepy. But it's only the beginning of monetizing viewing data for media content services.

Netflix is watching you. We're all watching you

ZDnet Blogs - December 15, 2017 - 9:03pm
The video streaming giant calling out its users on Twitter is creepy. But it's only the beginning of monetizing viewing data for media content services.
Categories: Opinion

For 8 days Windows bundled a password manager with a critical flaw

Ars Technica - December 15, 2017 - 8:58pm

Enlarge (credit: Microsoft)

For about eight days, some versions of Windows 10 quietly bundled a password manager that contained a critical vulnerability in its browser plug in, a researcher said Friday. The flaw was almost identical to one the same researcher disclosed in the same manager plugin 16 months ago that allowed websites to steal passwords.

Google Project Zero researcher Tavis Ormandy said in a blog post that the Keeper Password Manager came pre-installed on a newly built Windows 10 system derived directly from the Microsoft Developer Network. When he tested the unwanted app, he soon found it contained a bug that represents "a complete compromise of Keeper security, allowing any website to steal any password." He said he uncovered a flaw 16 months ago in the non-bundled version of the Keeper browser plugin that posed the same threat.

With only basic changes to "selectors," Ormandy's old proof-of-concept exploit worked on the Keeper version installed without notice or permission on his Windows 10 system. Ormandy's post linked to this publicly available proof-of-concept exploit, which steals an end user's Twitter password if it's stored in the Keeper app. After this post went live, a Keeper spokesman said the bug was different than the one Ormandy reported 16 months ago. He said it affected only version 11 of the app, which was released on December 6, and then only when a user had the accompanying browser plugin installed. The developer on Friday fixed the flaw in the just-released version 11.4 by removing the vulnerable "add to existing" functionality. The fix came 24 hours after Ormandy privately reported the flaw to Keeper.

Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Yes, that Netflix tweet is creepy — and raises serious privacy questions

ZDnet Blogs - December 15, 2017 - 8:54pm
Netflix's ability to extrapolate detailed and specific viewing habits from its vast data set leaves troubling questions about its employees' access to personal customer information.
Categories: Opinion

Yes, that Netflix tweet is creepy — and raises serious privacy questions

ZDnet News - December 15, 2017 - 8:54pm
Netflix's ability to extrapolate detailed and specific viewing habits from its vast data set leaves troubling questions about its employees' access to personal customer information.

Facebook confesses: Facebook is bad for you

The Register - December 15, 2017 - 8:49pm
Grazing FB is ruining your life, admits social network after probing its army of addicts

Facebook has just publicaly slapped itself upside the head, admitting that its very existence is often detrimental to the wellbeing of its users.…

Galaxy S9 could touch down late February, which makes sense - CNET

cNET.com - News - December 15, 2017 - 8:46pm
Samsung is rumored to unveil its next big phone in Barcelona.

Instagram is ruining your life and #hashtags aren't helping - CNET

cNET.com - News - December 15, 2017 - 8:26pm
Commentary: You can now follow hashtags on Instagram like they were people. But don't do it, I implore you. (You'll thank me later.)

Epic Mars portrait turns the planet on its head - CNET

cNET.com - News - December 15, 2017 - 8:21pm
Take a fresh look at Mars with a European Space Agency image that brings the planet into rare focus.

Amazon Prime's video lineup for January 2018 - CNET

cNET.com - News - December 15, 2017 - 8:16pm
"Reservoir Dogs," "Doctor Who," and "Zodiac" arrive on Amazon's streaming service.

Google Maps finally gets step-by-step transit navigation

Ars Technica - December 15, 2017 - 8:05pm

Enlarge / Left: Google Maps Transit directions with the new "start" button. Center and right: the new transit navigation notification. You can tap on the arrows to cycle through steps.

Google Maps is an awesome app for getting you where you need to go, but lately the app has treated transit directions like a second-class citizen. For years, driving, walking, and biking directions have had a "navigation" mode, which shows you a live map and gives you turn-by-turn directions. Transit doesn't have a "navigate" mode, though—it only ever shows a flat list of directions.

Today, Google is finally adding an actionable navigation mode to transit directions. Now when you pick out a transit route, you'll see a new "start" button at the bottom of the screen, along with the familiar navigation icon. This brings a number of improvements to transit directions.

When you hit the start button, the next step in your journey becomes a stickied, ongoing notification. The old transit mode was just a list inside the Maps app, which made multi-tasking on your phone very annoying. While sitting on the bus or subway, I would rather be reading a website, texting, or playing a game, but the anxiety of possibly missing my stop would have me constantly opening Google Maps again to check on my progress. With the notification, I can now easily see where I am without leaving the current app.

Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Residential, utility solar installation falls due to investment trends, Tesla

Ars Technica - December 15, 2017 - 7:57pm

The third quarter of 2017 has been an unusually slow one for the solar industry, according to a report from GTM Research released on Thursday. US solar installations fell to their lowest overall level since 2015, and residential and utility-scale solar projects fell quarter over quarter.

The only silver lining has been non-residential (largely commercial and community) solar installations, driven by developers in California, New York, and Massachusetts rushing to take advantage of state-level incentives, as well as installations in Minnesota boosted by Xcel Energy's "community solar" program.

Overall, solar panel installations in Q3 decreased 51 percent from Q3 in 2016, says GTM Research.

Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Samsung Gear IconX 2018 review - CNET

cNET.com - Reviews - December 15, 2017 - 7:55pm
With a much better battery life and an improved design, the second-generation IconX has become a totally wireless headphone contender against Apple's AirPods.

Oi, force Microsoft to cough up emails on Irish servers to the Feds, US states urge Supremes

The Register - December 15, 2017 - 7:55pm
AGs pressure America's top court to make Redmond hand over overseas messages

Microsoft should not be able to “shield evidence” held on Irish servers from US prosecutors, a group of 35 US state attorneys general has argued.…

Comcast to be “unleashed” on rivals when NBC merger conditions expire

Ars Technica - December 15, 2017 - 7:46pm

Enlarge (credit: Aurich Lawson)

Yesterday's repeal of net neutrality rules isn't the only good news Comcast is getting these days. In January 2018, the conditions imposed by the US government on Comcast's 2011 purchase of NBCUniversal will begin to expire.

Smaller cable companies that compete against Comcast are worried that Comcast will raise the price for carrying "must-have" programming such as regional sports networks, NBC's local TV stations, and NBC's national programming. The merger conditions require Comcast to submit to arbitration when there are disputes over prices, terms, and conditions of programming agreements with other pay-TV companies.

The FCC should impose new rules to essentially replace the arbitration conditions that expire in January, cable company RCN told the Federal Communications Commission in a filing this week. RCN is an "over-builder" that competes against Comcast by building its own infrastructure in areas already served by Comcast, such as Boston and Philadelphia.

Read 19 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Facebook Will Introduce Ads As Videos Start Playing

Slashdot - December 15, 2017 - 7:15pm
Categories: Geek, Opinion

All times are GMT +2. The time now is 11:18.


©2001-2017 - Baanboard.com - Baanforums.com