Baanboard.com

Go Back   Baanboard.com > News

User login

Frontpage Sponsor

Main

Poll
How big is your Baan-DB (just Data AND Indexes)
0 - 200 GB
18%
200 - 500 GB
29%
500 - 800 GB
3%
800 - 1200 GB
6%
1200 - 1500 GB
8%
1500 - 2000 GB
12%
> 2000 GB
23%
Total votes: 65

Baanboard at LinkedIn


Reference Content

 
RSS Newsfeeds

Google changes policy on abortion advertising

BBC Technology News - May 21, 2019 - 3:29pm
Advertisers will be made to disclose whether they provide abortions before running ads in the US, UK and Ireland.

Pre-E3 2019: Oculus wants you to paddle a stealth VR kayak—and it’s awesome

Ars Technica - May 21, 2019 - 3:00pm

Enlarge / Are you telling me you don't pack remote-detonation explosives, a dozen clips full of bullets, and a silenced pistol on your family kayak trip? Phantom: Covert Ops, a VR stealth game coming later this year to Oculus Quest and Oculus Rift, would like to have a word with your camping-trip organizer. (credit: Oculus Studios / nDreams)

SANTA MONICA, California—I could not stop giggling.

I had just watched a pitch for a new single-player stealth video game from Oculus Studios, titled Phantom: Covert Ops, and was intrigued. The video looked like an interesting game's opening sequence, in which players slip into a defended terrorist compound by paddling beneath its steel belly in a very quiet kayak. That's a cool, REI-style way to begin a VR version of Metal Gear Solid, I thought. I was sure we'd soon see a hero hop onto land and get down to VR-espionage business.

Then the 30-second video ended, and a producer for the game gestured to a series of Oculus Quest demo stations while talking at length about this "military kayak" system and how it enabled "free and comfortable exploration" within the confines of VR.

Read 19 remaining paragraphs | Comments

For the fifth year in a row, a named storm has formed early in the Atlantic

Ars Technica - May 21, 2019 - 2:25pm

Enlarge / Subtropical Storm Andrea, about 475km southwest of Bermuda, isn't much to look at. (credit: NOAA)

On Monday evening, forecasters at the National Hurricane Center determined that a low pressure system in the Atlantic Ocean had sustained winds of 40mph, and therefore should be named Subtropical Storm Andrea. This was the first named storm of the 2019 Atlantic season, and it could bring some moderate rainfall to Bermuda on Wednesday before dissipating.

Officially, the Atlantic hurricane season does not begin until June 1, and notionally ends on Nov. 30. However, the formation of Andrea marks the fifth year in a row—dating to Tropical Storm Ana in 2015—that a named storm has formed before June 1.

This is unprecedented. According to Phil Klotzbach, a hurricane scientist at the University of Colorado, the development of Andrea breaks the previous record of four consecutive years with a pre-June storm formation. The former record was set from 1951 through 1954, he told Ars. The total of seven pre-June storms this decade, the 2010s, has also tied the number recorded in the 1950s.

Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Linux Distros Without Systemd (2019)

Slashdot - May 21, 2019 - 2:15pm
Categories: Geek, Opinion

US warns of threat from Chinese drone companies

BBC Technology News - May 21, 2019 - 1:47pm
The alert raises concerns that the Chinese government might gain access to confidential data.

General Motors designs a new “brain and nervous system” for its vehicles

Ars Technica - May 21, 2019 - 1:05pm

Enlarge / An illustration of the new Cadillac CT5 with the electrical systems highlighted in teal. (credit: General Motors)

A common criticism of the increasingly digital nature of new cars and trucks is that all these new features are being shoehorned into systems that were not designed with features like connectivity in mind. The ubiquitous Controller Area Network bus (CANbus) first showed up in a new vehicle in 1991, long before anyone thought that it was a good idea to connect every new car to the Internet. To that end, on Monday, General Motors revealed an all-new platform architecture, designed with the needs of future-proofed connected autonomous electric vehicles in mind. "It's the brain and nervous system of the vehicles, and it's five times more capable than the one fitted to current vehicles," said Al Adams, GM's director of electric architecture and technology.

Adams is referring to the fact that the new electronic platform can manage processing up to 4.5TB per hour. One feature of the new electronic platform is support for much higher bandwidth, which means component connections of 100Mb/s, 1Gb/s, and 10Gb/s. Some of that will be helpful for the inclusion of advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS), and Adams said that the new electronic architecture will speed the rollout of GM's impressive "Super Cruise" driver assistance package across the automaker's lineup. It will also allow for higher resolution displays within the vehicle, whether that's the main instrument display in front of a driver or HD infotainment screens for the passengers.

The system has been designed with over-the-air updates in mind, an often-requested feature now that Tesla has proven the idea out. "Almost all the modules on the system have the ability to be OTA updated," explained Adams. "The interface is much like a smartphone and enables us to change the vehicle's character."

Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

We probably don’t descend from Australopithecus sediba

Ars Technica - May 21, 2019 - 11:45am

Enlarge / According to Du and Alemseged, A. sediba is probably not our direct ancestor. (credit: Brett Eloff courtesy Profberger and Wits University)

Sometime around 2 million years ago, a group of bipedal hominins in Eastern Africa gradually evolved into something that looked and acted enough like us to be part of our genus, Homo. This was an important moment in the evolutionary history of our species, but paleoanthropologists aren’t sure yet exactly which species actually gave rise to our branch of the hominin family tree. A new study, however, suggests that we can probably rule out one of the contenders.

Where did we come from?

The top contenders include a species called Australopithecus sediba, known from the fossilized remains of two adults and four children who apparently fell to their deaths in Malapa Cave around 1.9 million years ago. The other top contender is called A. afarensis, best known from the 3.2-million-year-old skeleton nicknamed Lucy and a set of preserved footprints near Laetoli, Tanzania.

Both species walked on two legs and probably made stone tools, but their shoulders, arms, and hands were also still built for climbing trees. So which species is actually our ancestor, and which is just a distant cousin?

Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Over The Rainbow composer sues Apple and other tech firms for piracy

BBC Technology News - May 21, 2019 - 10:53am
Harold Arlen's estate says Apple, Google and Amazon are conducting "massive piracy operations".

Minecraft: 10 years on, what's next?

BBC Technology News - May 21, 2019 - 6:18am
Ten years since Minecraft was first released, we've had a sneak peek at what the next ten years hold.

Ren Zhengfei says US government 'underestimates' Huawei

BBC Technology News - May 21, 2019 - 5:58am
A dispute over Huawei has escalated with implications for the firm, the tech sector and consumers.

Police facial recognition surveillance court case starts

BBC Technology News - May 21, 2019 - 1:51am
Campaigners say police use of the technology is like taking DNA or fingerprints without consent.

Ford Will Cut 7,000 White-Collar Jobs

Slashdot - May 21, 2019 - 1:15am
Categories: Geek, Opinion

Comic for May 20, 2019

Dilbert - May 21, 2019 - 12:59am
Categories: Geek

The pun-loving computer programs that write adverts

BBC Technology News - May 21, 2019 - 12:24am
AI-powered advertising copywriters are coming, but can they be taught to be as inventive as humans?

All times are GMT +2. The time now is 03:38.


©2001-2018 - Baanboard.com - Baanforums.com