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Poll
How big is your Baan-DB (just Data AND Indexes)
0 - 200 GB
18%
200 - 500 GB
18%
500 - 800 GB
6%
800 - 1200 GB
6%
1200 - 1500 GB
12%
1500 - 2000 GB
18%
> 2000 GB
24%
Total votes: 17

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Industry & Technology

New York ramps up probe into fake FCC comments on net neutrality - CNET

cNET.com - News - 57 min 44 sec ago
The state's attorney general has subpoenaed several industry and advocacy groups.

Apple's privacy portal now lets US customers download their data - CNET

cNET.com - News - 1 hour 13 min ago
The company has already made the portal available in Europe.

Key Facebook investors join push to oust Mark Zuckerberg as chairman - CNET

cNET.com - News - 1 hour 17 min ago
This latest proposal comes after Facebook revealed hackers stole personal info from 29 million people.

Twilio tweaks twicky twalkative bot toows to dewight devewopers: It's Autopilot for chat apps

The Register - 1 hour 26 min ago
Cloud comms upstart touts more authentic engagement through artificial intelligence

At its Signal show in San Francisco, California, today, cloud comms biz Twilio intends to debut a chatbot platform called Autopilot for creating chatty software agents suitable for integration with a variety of services, including interactive voice response (IVR) systems, SMS, chat, Alexa, Slack, and Google Assistant.…

For the Pixel 3, Google is betting on a chip to bring Android security - CNET

cNET.com - News - 1 hour 28 min ago
The chip is a variation of what Google uses to protect its data centers.

Rocket Lab follows footsteps of SpaceX with new NASA launch pad - CNET

cNET.com - News - 1 hour 32 min ago
The smaller space startup will set up shop at NASA's Wallops Island facility on the Virginia coastline.

Harrison Ford digitally inserted via AI into Solo: A Star Wars Story - CNET

cNET.com - News - 1 hour 42 min ago
See what happens when machine learning is used to replace Alden Ehrenreich with a young Harrison Ford.

Sony's Xperia XZ3 is available for purchase now for $900 - CNET

cNET.com - News - 1 hour 43 min ago
You can get it, unlocked, at Amazon and Best Buy.

Twitter opens huge archive of tweets tied to Russia, Iran misinformation - CNET

cNET.com - News - 1 hour 55 min ago
See with your own eyes what Twitter calls "nefarious attempts" to wreak havoc on social media.

Mad scientists flip the Earth’s spin in climate models, watch water go nuts

Ars Technica - 1 hour 56 min ago

Enlarge (credit: Gabriela Pinto)

Climate models—computer simulations of Earth’s climate system—are crucial tools for scientists, given that it's impossible to run experiments on the entire planet. Access to these digital laboratories also gives people the option to occasionally play “mad scientist” and mess with the Earth a bit. One newly published study falls into that category, asking the question “What would happen if the Earth spun backward?” You can almost hear the maniacal laughter.

Back flip

If you’ve ever learned about the atmosphere, you know that Earth’s rotation makes swirling weather like hurricanes possible through something called the Coriolis Effect. Simply put, fluids heading in a straight line on a spinning globe deflect off to the side—to the right in the Northern Hemisphere and to the left in the Southern Hemisphere. And if the Earth’s rotation reversed, fluids (including ocean currents) would deflect the other way.

It may sound like a trivial bit of pondering, but it’s actually a scientifically interesting question. A group led by Uwe Mikolajewicz of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology effectively set the planet spinning backward to find out just how many things would change when they let their model run for a few thousand years.

Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

There's a limited-edition Taco Bell themed Xbox One X, because why not - CNET

cNET.com - News - 2 hours 5 min ago
It's for those gamers out there who really like their chalupas.

After $5 billion EU antitrust fine, Google will start charging for Android apps

Ars Technica - 2 hours 8 min ago

(credit: Aurich Lawson)

Google is adjusting to life in the EU after the $5.05 billion (€4.34 billion) antitrust fine levied against it by the European Commission earlier this year. Google is still appealing the initial ruling, which found that Google used Android to illegally dominate the search market, but for now Google will comply with the ruling and offer looser licensing agreements to Android device makers.

In a post on the official Google Blog titled "Complying with the EC’s Android decision," Google outlined a few changes coming to the Google app licensing agreements that it offers to Android OEMs. As you might recall from the numerous times we've written about it, this announcement is a change to the secretive "Mobile Application Distribution Agreement" (MADA) document that is a requirement for getting access to the Play Store and other Google apps. What we think of as a commercial "Android" device comes in two parts. The core Android OS is free and open source—anyone can take it and do whatever they want with it without Google's involvement. If you want the Play Store, Google Maps, Gmail, and all the other Google apps you need to make a viable commercial smartphone, though, you need to talk to Google and sign an MADA, which comes with a ton of restrictions.

The new rules

Google's new MADA makes three big changes. First, Google's blog states "Android partners wishing to distribute Google apps may also build non-compatible, or forked, smartphones and tablets for the European Economic Area (EEA)." The last time we saw an MADA document (back in 2014), it had an "anti-fragmentation" clause, which said that any company signing the agreement has to be all-in on Google's Android. If you produced any Android device without Google's apps, you got booted from the Google ecosystem. This means that a company like Amazon, which makes forked Kindle devices, could never ship a smartphone with Google apps.

Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Huawei Mate 20 Pro is outrageously innovative - CNET

cNET.com - Reviews - 2 hours 19 min ago
If the Samsung Galaxy S9 and iPhone X had a phone baby, this is it.

It's a fun time to cook in the smart kitchen - CNET

cNET.com - News - 2 hours 20 min ago
But how much will it help the people just trying to get dinner on the table?

Crazy case turns iPhone XS into blinged-out skeleton watch - CNET

cNET.com - News - 2 hours 22 min ago
Caviar's old-school mechanical watch case is worthy of Doctor Who.

Ars on your lunch break: Getting high and breaking faith

Ars Technica - 2 hours 27 min ago

Enlarge / Let's go on a journey. A journey with drugs! (credit: NBC Universal)

Today we’re presenting the second installment of my wide-ranging interview with outspoken author, podcaster, philosopher, and recovering neuroscientist Sam Harris. Part one ran yesterday. If you missed it, click right here. Otherwise, you can press play on the embedded audio player or pull up the transcript—both of which are below.

In today’s installment, we discuss some of the experiences that shaped Sam's perspectives and interests. His father was raised Quaker, and his mother was Jewish—but neither were at all religious, and Sam had a wholly secular upbringing. As a freshman at Stanford (where he and I happened to overlap as undergraduates), he recalls being irked by the special treatment he felt the Bible received in a required course on Western culture. However, he didn’t label himself an “atheist” at the time—although in retrospect, he essentially was one.

Everything changed when he tried the drug MDMA (which is more commonly known to its friends as "Molly" or "Ecstasy"). This wasn’t at a party or rave but part of a quiet exploration of the mind’s capabilities (more of a Timothy Leary experience than a Ken Kesey one, for those versed in the history of psychedelics).

Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella is worth 154 median minions

The Register - 2 hours 28 min ago
But that's not as bad as Barbie flinger Mattel or, indeed, Oracle

It has been a bumper year for Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella, whose compensation soared to $25.8m in fiscal 2018. Quite a bit more than the median salary of the rest of the company, which hovered at an admittedly none-too-shabby $167,689.…

Arrowverse's Elseworlds poster reveals crossover clues - CNET

cNET.com - News - 2 hours 44 min ago
A new poster shows interesting costume choices for Arrow and the Flash.

Rent a bunch of Marvel movies for $1.99 each - CNET

cNET.com - News - 2 hours 56 min ago
Prime subscribers can score The Avengers, Captain America, Thor and more for just $2 apiece. And get Ant-Man and the Wasp for just $3. Plus: Halloween deals!

Arcade1Up is next-level retro gaming with cabinets for Street Fighter and other classics - CNET

cNET.com - Reviews - 2 hours 57 min ago
It’s weird to love a $300 video game. But that’s the funny thing about nostalgia.

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