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For ERP LN feature pack upgrade, what method of install are you using?
Installation Wizard into existing VRC
41%
Installation Wizard into new VRC
29%
Manual into existing VRC
6%
Manual into new VRC
24%
Total votes: 17

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Industry & Technology

Single-player modding returns to GTA V after publisher takedown

Ars Technica - 1 hour 18 min ago

Enlarge / This image represents Take-Two saying "Well, I guess, there's nothing illegal here after all. Never mind that legal threat." (credit: Take-Two Interactive)

When popular Grand Theft Auto V modding tool OpenIV was taken down by a cease-and-desist request from publisher Take-Two earlier this month, the fan reaction was fast and blistering. Players bombarded Grand Theft Auto V with thousands of negative reviews on Steam, and over 77,000 people signed an online petition demanding the tool be restored.

Apparently, those gamers' cries have been heard loud and clear. As of yesterday evening, OpenIV is once again being updated and distributed by its creators.

While publisher Take-Two has been going after cheating tools in GTA Online of late, developer Rockstar long ago said it wouldn't go after Grand Theft Auto V players for using single-player mods. That's why Take-Two's sudden legal threat against the single-player-focused OpenIV earlier this month was a bit surprising, to say the least.

Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

A 'cutting-edge' Confederate death trap inspired today's sub - CNET

cNET.com - News - 1 hour 23 min ago
From CNET Magazine: The H.L. Hunley was the first sub to sink an enemy ship. It was also a playbook on how not to design a submarine.

Roundup: The best “escape room” games for a breakout party

Ars Technica - 3 hours 17 min ago

Enlarge / Some typical escape room components—plus a "Chrono Decoder"—from Escape Room: The Game. (credit: Spinmaster)

Welcome to Ars Cardboard, our weekend look at tabletop games! Check out our complete board gaming coverage at cardboard.arstechnica.com—and let us know what you think.

I don't know CPR. I can't tie a tourniquet. But I can work my way out of a locked, puzzle-stuffed room in 60 minutes or less.

I've been honing this vital skill over the last year as the current mania for physical "escape rooms" has made its way to the tabletop. In an escape room, a team of players works together to solve codes and puzzles that will eventually provide a means of escape. Usually this requires organizing a group, traveling to a physical location, and paying a significant per-person fee.

Read 28 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Persona 3’s ending made me appreciate all of life’s little endings

Ars Technica - 3 hours 18 min ago

Enlarge / It's hard to tell from this promo image, but this game is a poignant meditation on friendship and death.

It was easier for me to walk away from Persona 3 than I expected. The game about nine friends and a dog—which celebrates its tenth anniversary in the States this year—follows a similar arc to most role-playing games. That means the gang of plucky young people ultimately saves the world. Yet its 21st century characters and setting made Persona 3 far more relatable and endearing to me than the high-flying heroes of Final Fantasy or Chrono Trigger. It helps, too, that this was the series' first game to sport a now-signature blend of dating sim and turn-based dungeon crawling.

Playing Persona 3, I felt I was experiencing the first game designed to let me take my time. Whether that meant meeting up with a friend for kendo practice or hanging out with a couple of elderly used booksellers, there was nearly always something more digestible, recognizable, and less world-shatteringly urgent to do than fighting gods and monsters. It's the kind of stuff that let me inhabit a game's world for a bit rather than simply tour through it. Tearing up specters and saving the Earth from supernatural threats is fun, but it’s a bit harder to relate to in a way that feels like my real life.

By the end of the game, I was nearly as attached to the city of Iwatodai and its inhabitants as I've ever been to a real place. The downside is that this made it that much harder to eventually say goodbye to those virtual sights I saw and friends I made along the way. What made that goodbye easier was a special, quiet message before the closing credits—one that reminds me how to accept the end of comfort and friendship even today.

Read 17 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Sorry iPhone, you’re not the only great dual-camera phone - CNET

cNET.com - News - 4 hours 18 min ago
The iPhone 7 Plus has Portrait Mode, but so does the OnePlus 5.

Our favorite summer blockbusters of all time - CNET

cNET.com - News - 4 hours 18 min ago
Each week we take a poll around the office to see what makes our colleagues tick. This week we asked which are the best summer blockbusters ever and why.

Instagram 'Favorites' list lets you control who sees your pics - CNET

cNET.com - News - 5 hours 4 sec ago
Not everything on Instagram is worth sharing to the world.

Cannabis World Congress lights up New York - CNET

cNET.com - News - 6 hours 18 min ago
Just how much tech does it take to get to the center of the emerging marijuana market? We found out at the fourth annual Cannabis World Congress in New York City.

'Looking for Leia' film shines light on Star Wars fangirls - CNET

cNET.com - News - 10 hours 1 min ago
Annalise Ophelian talks about her crowdfunded documentary, which asks women inspired by Star Wars about their love for a galaxy far, far away.

Capita flogs Asset Services division for £888m

The Register - 10 hours 14 min ago
'The reduction in leverage is significant' – Parker

Everyone’s favourite people pimp Capita has permanently outsourced its Asset Services businesses to Link Administration for £888m – a fleeting injection of cash in the bank that will be used to reduce debts.…

Does US have right to data on overseas servers? We’re about to find out

Ars Technica - 14 hours 51 min ago

Enlarge / Microsoft in Dublin, Ireland. (credit: Red Agenda)

The Justice Department on Friday petitioned the US Supreme Court to step into an international legal thicket, one that asks whether US search warrants extend to data stored on foreign servers. The US government says it has the legal right, with a valid court warrant, to reach into the world's servers with the assistance of the tech sector, no matter where the data is stored.

The request for Supreme Court intervention concerns a 4-year-old legal battle between Microsoft and the US government over data stored on Dublin, Ireland servers. The US government has a valid warrant for the e-mail as part of a drug investigation. Microsoft balked at the warrant, and convinced a federal appeals court that US law does not apply to foreign data.

The government on Friday told the justices that US law allows it to get overseas data, and national security was at risk.

Read 16 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Tech giants flash Russia their code blueprints in exchange for access

The Register - 16 hours 21 min ago
What could possibly go wrong?

Cisco, IBM, HP, McAfee and SAP are among plenty of western technology companies that have been showing their source code to Russian authorities in exchange for the right to sell their products in the country.…

Tech investor accused of sexual harassment takes leave - CNET

cNET.com - News - 17 hours 1 min ago
Justin Caldbeck, co-founder of Silicon Valley VC firm Binary Capital, apologizes to those he hurt and "to the greater tech ecosystem."

32TB of Windows 10 beta builds, driver source code leaked [Updated]

Ars Technica - 17 hours 3 min ago

Enlarge (credit: Rural Learning Center)

32TB of unreleased, private Windows 10 builds, along with source code for certain parts of the driver stack, have been leaked to BetaArchive, reports The Register.

The dump appears to contain a number of Windows 10 builds from the development of codenamed Redstone 2. Redstone 2 was released earlier this year, branded as the Creators Update.

Some of these builds are built for 64-bit ARM chips, and some are said to include private debug symbols. Microsoft routinely releases debug symbols for Windows; the symbols contain additional information not found in the compiled Windows binaries that helps software developers identify which functions their code is calling. The symbols normally released are public symbols; while they identify many (though not all) functions and data structures, they don't contain information about each function's variables or parameters. The private symbols, in contrast, contain much more extensive information, giving much more insight into what each piece of code is doing and how it's doing it.

Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Anthem to shell out $115m in largest-ever data theft settlement

The Register - 17 hours 8 min ago
Good day to be an attorney, or a Maserati salesman

Health insurer Anthem has today agreed to pay $115m to settle a class-action suit brought on by its 2015 cyber-theft of 78.8 million records.…

Plastic Water Bottles Might Have Poisoned Ancient Californians

Wired - 17 hours 18 min ago
Native Americans living in California made their own plastic water bottles. However, they didn't know how toxic that might be.

Is Uber 2.0 now possible after CEO’s departure? - CNET

cNET.com - News - 17 hours 45 min ago
Uber may get a fresh start after Travis Kalanick's resignation this week. But any new CEO needs to own up to the company's past -- and watch out for the old one's continued involvement.

AES-256 keys sniffed in seconds using €200 of kit a few inches away

The Register - 18 hours 20 min ago
Van Eck phreaking getting surprisingly cheap

Sideband attacks that monitor a computer's electromagnetic output to snaffle passwords are nothing new. They usually require direct access to the target system and a lot of expensive machinery – but no longer.…

20 of the best 'Game of Thrones' fan theories - CNET

cNET.com - News - 18 hours 32 min ago
Who's going to kill whom? Who's already dead? And who will ride the dragons?

FCC: LEO ISPs A-OK

The Register - 19 hours 7 min ago
OneWeb gets green light to pipe internet through 720 orbiting satellites

America's broadband watchdog, the FCC, has approved OneWeb's proposal to launch an ISP on the backs of 720 orbiting satellites.…


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