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0 - 200 GB
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Industry & Technology

Senate report said to show extent of Russian interference in 2016 US election - CNET

cNET.com - News - 3 hours 17 min ago
Report shows Russian agents sought to secure Trump win.

HQ Trivia and Vine co-founder dead at 34

Ars Technica - 3 hours 20 min ago

Enlarge / Honorees Rus Yusupov (L) and Colin Kroll accept the Breakthrough Award for Emerging Technology onstage at the Variety Breakthrough of the Year Awards during the 2014 International CES at The Las Vegas Hotel & Casino on January 9, 2014 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (credit: Jeff Bottari/Getty Images for Variety)

The co-founder of the popular smartphone-based trivia game, HQ Trivia, Colin Kroll, was found dead at his New York apartment on Sunday, local media reported.

A New York Police Department spokesman told Ars that Kroll died of a drug overdose.

According to the New York Post, citing anonymous police sources, Kroll, 34, was found with marijuana and heroin near his body.

Kroll, back in 2012, also co-founded Vine, a popular video looping app that was quickly acquired by Twitter and later shuttered four years later.

On Sunday afternoon, HQ Trivia issued this tweet:

We learned today of the passing of our friend and founder, Colin Kroll, and it's with deep sadness that we say goodbye. Our thoughts go out to his family, friends and loved ones during this incredibly difficult time.

— HQ Trivia (@hqtrivia) December 16, 2018

Rus Yusupov, Kroll’s fellow co-founder, also tweeted:

So sad to hear about the passing of my friend and co-founder Colin Kroll. My thoughts &  prayers go out to his loved ones. I will forever remember him for his kind soul and big heart. He made the world and internet a better place. Rest in peace, brother.

— Rus (@rus) December 16, 2018

HQ Trivia, a live online game that awards cash prizes became incredibly popular in the months after its August 2017 debut, but its popularity has since waned.

Read on Ars Technica | Comments

Best mobile games of 2018 - CNET

cNET.com - News - 3 hours 34 min ago
Looking for a new game to play on your phone or tablet? Here are our picks of the best mobile games.

The 56 best Android games of 2018 - CNET

cNET.com - News - 4 hours 11 min ago
These are unequivocally the best Android games on the planet.

Robert Downey Jr. responds to NASA advice for saving Tony Stark - CNET

cNET.com - News - December 16, 2018 - 11:43pm
Ground control to Major Tony: Failure is not an option, space agency tells the actor who plays the Marvel superhero.

HQ Trivia and Vine co-founder Colin Kroll dead at 34

BBC Technology News - December 16, 2018 - 11:18pm
New York police officers went to Colin Kroll's Manhattan flat after a request to check on him.

Apple lied about iPhone X, XS and Max screen sizes and pixel counts, lawsuit alleges - CNET

cNET.com - News - December 16, 2018 - 11:09pm
The plaintiffs are seeking class action status.

Trump will replace Interior Department Secretary next week

Ars Technica - December 16, 2018 - 10:30pm

Enlarge / US Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke arrives at the US Capitol prior to the service for former President George H. W. Bush on December 03, 2018 in Washington, DC. (credit: Photo by Shawn Thew - Pool/Getty Images)

On Friday, President Trump announced on Twitter that Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke will step down from his post in the coming weeks. Zinke has headed the Department of the Interior (DOI) since 2017 and overseen some of the more significant rollbacks in environmental policy in the US.

Trump said a successor to Zinke would be named in the coming week. A likely successor, according to Reuters, is David Bernhardt, the current Interior Deputy Secretary and a former oil, gas, and water industry lobbyist. According to Politico, Bernhardt played an active role in weakening Endangered Species protections to make it easier for oil and gas drilling to occur on ecologically sensitive land.

Zinke's time in office was marked by a similar effort to stymie the environmental protections put in place by the Obama Administration in the name of oil and gas interests. In one of his most controversial moves, Zinke reopened vast tracts of federal waters that had previously been off-limits to offshore oil and gas drilling. The Secretary drew sharp criticism for opening up federal waters adjacent to states that didn't want offshore drilling, while exempting Florida from the same treatment after a meeting from the state's Republican governor.

Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

HQ Trivia and Vine founder Colin Kroll dead at 35 - CNET

cNET.com - News - December 16, 2018 - 10:23pm
His death is being investigated as a possible drug overdose.

Delivery robot catches fire on UC Berkeley campus - CNET

cNET.com - News - December 16, 2018 - 9:38pm
KiwiBot says fire was caused by battery-replacement error.

Echo Wall Clock now available on Amazon, brings visual cues to Alexa timers - CNET

cNET.com - News - December 16, 2018 - 8:36pm
For when you want that groovy countdown effect.

No more doubts: Two independent studies confirm LIGO’s Nobel discovery

Ars Technica - December 16, 2018 - 7:13pm

Enlarge / LIGO's February 11, 2016, press conference in Washington, DC, where they announced the first direct detection of gravitational waves. (credit: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

Just last month, we told you about a small group of Danish physicists who were casting doubt on the original gravitational wave signal detected by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), saying it was an "illusion." The researchers alleged that the collaboration mistook patterns in the noise for a signal. Now Quanta is reporting that two independent analyses have been completed that confirm that detection. This should lay any doubts about the momentous discovery to rest.

“We see no justification for lingering doubts about the discovery of gravitational waves,” the authors of one of the papers, Martin Green and John Moffat of the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, told Quanta. That paper appeared in Physics Letters B in September. A second paper by Alex Nielsen of the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics in Hannover, Germany, and three coauthors, was posted to the physics preprint site arXiv.org last month and is under review by the Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics.

But some drama still remains. Andrew Jackson, group spokesman for the skeptical physicists at the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen, Denmark, is refusing to accept the results of the two independent groups' analyses. Quanta's Natalie Wolchover writes:

Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

California transit agencies have 21 years to build zero-emissions bus fleets

Ars Technica - December 16, 2018 - 6:30pm

Enlarge / One of Antelope Valley Transit Authority's 79 electric buses. (credit: Megan Geuss)

On Friday, California's Air Resources Board (CARB) unanimously approved a regulation that would compel the state's public transit agencies to build zero-emissions fleets by 2040. According to the San Francisco Chronicle, the regulation would also prohibit transit agencies from investing in diesel- or gas-powered buses after 2029. Buses usually last about 12 years before they need to be replaced, the Chronicle noted.

In a press release on Friday, CARB noted that the transportation sector contributes 40 percent of the state's greenhouse gas emissions, and 80 to 90 percent of the state's smog-creating pollutants. "Full implementation of the regulation adopted today is expected to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 19 million metric tons from 2020 to 2050 – the equivalent of taking 4 million cars off the road," CARB wrote.

Battery-electric and fuel cell buses are two potential avenues for investment, CARB noted. The air resources board added that roughly 12,000 gas- or diesel-burning buses are on California's roads today, but only 153 zero-emissions buses are in operation in California today. Still, based on orders placed by transit agencies, 1,000 such buses are expected to be in service by 2020.

Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Fortnite was the most important video game of 2018, whether we like it or not - CNET

cNET.com - News - December 16, 2018 - 4:34pm
This was a huge year for video games, but none had an impact quite like Fortnite

Tech that died in 2018 - CNET

cNET.com - News - December 16, 2018 - 4:29pm
From high-profile flameouts to quiet departures, this year's crop of tech-related dead, dying, resurrected and barely hanging in for 2019 offers an embarrassment of riches.

PewDiePie printer hackers strike again

BBC Technology News - December 16, 2018 - 3:59pm
The perpetrators are urging victims to support the YouTube star and protect their systems.

Huawei Watch GT review: When hardware and software don’t mesh

Ars Technica - December 16, 2018 - 3:30pm

Enlarge (credit: Valentina Palladino)

Only a handful of wearable operating systems exists today. Dominating the market are watchOS and Wear OS, unsurprisingly so, as they accompany the two most popular smartphone operating systems. But there are a few challengers out there, like Samsung's Tizen and Fitbit OS, that give users other options.

Variety is good, so I'm always interested in testing out wearables that don't run the most popular OSes. Huawei's latest smartwatch, the Huawei Watch GT, falls into this category, as it runs the company's LiteOS rather than WearOS. While the Chinese company has primarily focused on its smartphone business this year, going the extra mile to put its own OS on this smartwatch shows that it's serious about wearables (at least, for the time being).

So what do the Huawei Watch GT and LiteOS have to offer? Essentially, the device is a simplified smartwatch that has all the hardware bells and whistles you'd expect from a a high-end Wear OS device or an Apple Watch—things like an AMOLED display, a continuous heart-rate monitor, an embedded GPS, and more. But in practice, its feature set and its real-world abilities don't exactly match its relatively high, $230 price tag.

Read 39 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Forget Fortnite—my son is still obsessed with Minecraft

Ars Technica - December 16, 2018 - 2:22pm

Enlarge (credit: Aurich / Getty)

Though my ten-year-old’s obsession with Minecraft first took hold three years ago—back when Minecraft was all the rage—I have to hand it to him. He’s sticking with it, despite the imperialist hegemony of Fortnite. What’s more, he’s not a fan of the newer game. “Too much violence,” he says, despite his affection for Nerf guns and laser tag.

The Minecraft connection began when some of my friends came by with an iPad and a teenager. “While we catch up,” my friends said, “Henry [their kid] can show Gus [my kid] all the stuff he’s building in Minecraft.” 

It sounded innocent enough—not like the kind of thing that would destroy the very fabric of our family.

Read 60 remaining paragraphs | Comments

The iPhone XR in blue looks stellar under a macro lens - CNET

cNET.com - News - December 16, 2018 - 6:00am
We get intimate with the colorful iPhone XR, which features a big screen, wireless charging and an excellent camera.

USB Type-C has taken over -- here are the latest phones to prove it - CNET

cNET.com - News - December 16, 2018 - 4:00am
Move over, Micro-USB. The USB Type-C standard is here, faster and (best of all) flippable -- so you can plug it in right the first time, every time.

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