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Poll
How big is your Baan-DB (just Data AND Indexes)
0 - 200 GB
17%
200 - 500 GB
17%
500 - 800 GB
6%
800 - 1200 GB
6%
1200 - 1500 GB
17%
1500 - 2000 GB
17%
> 2000 GB
22%
Total votes: 18

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Reference Content

 
Industry & Technology

Volkswagen is building an EV factory near Shanghai, should Tesla be worried? - Roadshow

cNET.com - News - October 21, 2018 - 1:01pm
The new facility will be environmentally friendly and build vehicles on the all-electric MEB platform.

These new kitchen gadgets will change how you cook, store and dispose of your food - CNET

cNET.com - News - October 21, 2018 - 1:00pm
We got a look at the latest in food tech at the 2018 Smart Kitchen Summit.

Keegan-Michael Key and the most ridiculous 5G interview ever - CNET

cNET.com - News - October 21, 2018 - 1:00pm
Has the 5G hype gotten out of hand? Just wait until comedic actor Keegan-Michael Key weighs in.

TP-Link Kasa Smart Wi-Fi Power Strip review: Tons of smarts make this power strip worth buying - CNET

cNET.com - Reviews - October 21, 2018 - 12:00pm
An impressive app and smart home features make this power strip worth the price.

Huawei Mate 20 Pro vs. iPhone XS, Pixel 3, Galaxy S9: Every spec, compared - CNET

cNET.com - News - October 21, 2018 - 11:45am
Huawei is bringing interesting new features to its latest phones, so we broke down the numbers for how the Mates compare to the hottest handsets right now.

Huawei Mate 20 Pro is outrageously innovative - CNET

cNET.com - Reviews - October 21, 2018 - 11:30am
If the Samsung Galaxy S9 and iPhone X had a phone baby, this is it.

Twitter employee may have spied on users for Saudis, says report - CNET

cNET.com - News - October 21, 2018 - 4:42am
Intelligence officials alerted the social network in 2015, and it fired the worker, reports The New York Times.

The two Venom post-credits scenes, explained - CNET

cNET.com - News - October 21, 2018 - 2:47am
The most clunky sequel-bait imaginable and a surprise from another world. What does it all mean? Warning: spoilers ahead.

The Nuimo Click is a wireless, self-powering smart switch for Sonos and Hue - CNET

cNET.com - Reviews - October 20, 2018 - 10:00pm
The Nuimo Click can toggle your smart lights or adjust the volume on your Sonos speakers -- and it powers itself.

Mixing John Lennon's Imagine: We meet engineer Rob Stevens - CNET

cNET.com - News - October 20, 2018 - 8:55pm
It’s a dream job for an engineer. Rob Stevens tells us how he brings out the best in John Lennon's solo work.

Hack on 8 adult websites exposes oodles of intimate user data

Ars Technica - October 20, 2018 - 8:45pm

Enlarge / One of the hacked websites, wifelovers.com, as it appeared on October 12. (credit: Internet Archive)

A recent hack of eight poorly secured adult websites has exposed megabytes of personal data that could be damaging to the people who shared pictures and other highly intimate information on the online message boards. Included in the leaked file are (1) IP addresses that connected to the sites, (2) user passwords protected by a four-decade-old cryptographic scheme, (3) names, and (4) 1.2 million unique email addresses, although it’s not clear how many of the addresses legitimately belonged to actual users.

Robert Angelini, the owner of wifelovers.com and the seven other breached sites, told Ars on Saturday morning that, in the 21 years they operated, fewer than 107,000 people posted to them. He said he didn’t know how or why the almost 98-megabyte file contained more than 12 times that many email addresses, and he hasn’t had time to examine a copy of the database that he received on Friday night.

Still, three days after receiving notification of the hack, Angelini finally confirmed the breach and took down the sites on early Saturday morning. A notice on the just-shuttered sites warns users to change passwords on other sites, especially if they match the passwords used on the hacked sites.

Read 15 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Lynk & Co is partnering with Cyan to go racing - Roadshow

cNET.com - News - October 20, 2018 - 6:42pm
The Chinese mobility startup will enter the 2019 World Touring Car Championship with the racing version of its 03 sedan.

Anonymous Facebook ads say 'bin Chequers'

BBC Technology News - October 20, 2018 - 3:23pm
A senior MP questions how a pro-Brexit website can run adverts without saying who has paid for them.

Microsoft’s problem isn’t how often it updates Windows—it’s how it develops it

Ars Technica - October 20, 2018 - 3:15pm

Enlarge / Windows 10 during a product launch event in Tokyo in July 2015. (credit: Kiyoshi Ota/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

It's fair to say that the Windows 10 October 2018 Update has not been Microsoft's most successful update. Reports of data loss quickly emerged, forcing Microsoft to suspend distribution of the update. It has since been fixed and is currently undergoing renewed testing pending a re-release.

This isn't the first Windows feature update that's had problems—we've seen things like significant hardware incompatibilities in previous updates—but it's certainly the worst. While most of us know the theory of having backups, the reality is that lots of data, especially on home PCs, has no real backup, and deleting that data is thus disastrous.

Windows as a service

Microsoft's ambition with Windows 10 was to radically shake up how it develops Windows 10. The company wanted to better respond to customer and market needs, and to put improved new features into customers' hands sooner. Core to this was the notion that Windows 10 is the "last" version of Windows—all new development work will be an update to Windows 10, delivered through feature updates several times a year. This new development model was branded "Windows as a Service." And after some initial fumbling, Microsoft settled on a cadence of two feature updates a year; one in April, one in October.

Read 49 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Vendors confirm products affected by libssh bug as PoC code pops up on GitHub

ZDnet News - October 20, 2018 - 3:07pm
Red Hat and F5 Networks acknowledge that some products are vulnerable to the libssh authentication bug.

This $33 Bluetooth speaker sounds better than it has any right to - CNET

cNET.com - News - October 20, 2018 - 2:53pm
Incredibly enough, the Audiophiliac is smitten with the Tribit XSound Go Bluetooth speaker!

Luke Cage cancelled by Netflix and Marvel - CNET

cNET.com - News - October 20, 2018 - 2:38pm
Sweet Christmas! First Iron Fist is gone, now Luke Cage. Are Jessica Jones, Daredevil and the Punisher next on the chopping block?

Collapse of ancient city’s water system may have led to its demise

Ars Technica - October 20, 2018 - 2:30pm

Enlarge / The Cambodian city of Angkor was once the largest in the world until vast swathes of the population decamped in the 15th century. Its famous temple, Angkor Wat (above), survived. (credit: Stefan Irvine/LightRocket/Getty Images)

The Cambodian city of Angkor was once the largest in the world... then the vast majority of its inhabitants suddenly decamped in the 15th century to a region near the modern city of Phnom Penh. Historians have put forth several theories about why this mass exodus occurred. A new paper in Science Advances argues that one major contributing factor was an overloaded water distribution system, exacerbated by extreme swings in the climate.

Angkor dates back to around 802 CE. Its vast network of canals, moats, embankments, and reservoirs developed over the next 600 years, helping distribute vital water resources for such uses as irrigation and to help control occasional flooding. By the end of the 11th century, the system bore all the features of a complex network, with thousands of interconnected individual components heavily dependent on each other.

Such a configuration, hovering at or near the so-called critical point, is ideal for the effective flow of resources, whether we're talking about water, electricity (power grids), traffic, the spread of disease, or information (the stock market and the Internet). The tradeoff is that it can become much more sensitive to even tiny perturbations—so much so that a small outage in one part of the network can trigger a sudden network-wide cascading failure.

Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

2 movies for $5: Wonder Woman and Batman v Superman Extended Cut - CNET

cNET.com - News - October 20, 2018 - 2:21pm
Wonder Woman alone -- you know, the good one -- would cost you $10 from most streaming services.

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