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For ERP LN feature pack upgrade, what method of install are you using?
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Industry & Technology

IDG Contributor Network: 7 things startups need to know about cybersecurity

CIO.com - IT industry - August 15, 2017 - 3:19pm

It’s hard to imagine any business that doesn’t use any form of technology these days. The problem is, any computing infrastructure or equipment can be exposed to various methods of cyberattacks. Just last May, the WannaCry ransomware affected more than 10,000 organizations of all sizes in more than 150 countries. The attack caused stoppages in critical services and operations such as the UK’s National Health Service and several of Renault’s automotive manufacturing plants. Last year, one billion Yahoo users saw their accounts hacked, costing the company dearly.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: 7 things startups need to know about cybersecurity

CIO.com - IT industry - August 15, 2017 - 3:19pm

It’s hard to imagine any business that doesn’t use any form of technology these days. The problem is, any computing infrastructure or equipment can be exposed to various methods of cyberattacks. Just last May, the WannaCry ransomware affected more than 10,000 organizations of all sizes in more than 150 countries. The attack caused stoppages in critical services and operations such as the UK’s National Health Service and several of Renault’s automotive manufacturing plants. Last year, one billion Yahoo users saw their accounts hacked, costing the company dearly.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

What is ITIL? IT Infrastructure Library definitions and solutions

CIO.com - Infrastructure - August 15, 2017 - 11:00am
What is ITIL?

The IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL) is a library of volumes describing a framework of best practices for delivering IT services. The ITIL has gone through several revisions in its history and currently comprises five books, each covering various processes and stages of the IT service lifecycle. The ITIL, currently ITIL v3, focuses on business and IT integration, and ITIL certifications can be earned at five levels. ITIL’s systematic approach to IT service management can help businesses manage risk, strengthen customer relations, establish cost-effective practices, and build a stable IT environment that allows for growth, scale and change.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

What is ITIL? IT Infrastructure Library definitions and solutions

CIO.com - Infrastructure - August 15, 2017 - 11:00am
What is ITIL?

The IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL) is a library of volumes describing a framework of best practices for delivering IT services. The ITIL has gone through several revisions in its history and currently comprises five books, each covering various processes and stages of the IT service lifecycle. The ITIL, currently ITIL v3, focuses on business and IT integration, and ITIL certifications can be earned at five levels. ITIL’s systematic approach to IT service management can help businesses manage risk, strengthen customer relations, establish cost-effective practices, and build a stable IT environment that allows for growth, scale and change.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: 3 ways that revenue recognition will impact IT

CIO.com - IT industry - August 9, 2017 - 3:12pm

Has your CFO been talking about something called revenue recognition that's supposed to go live next year? It’s a completely new five-step model that replaces over 150 pieces of existing guidance on how to recognize revenue and consistently applies the same approach across industries – so no more specialized industry rules.

The five-step model is as follows:

  1. Identify the contract with the customer
  2. Identify the performance obligations
  3. Determine the transaction price
  4. Allocate the transaction price to the performance obligations
  5. Recognize revenue when (or as) performance obligations are satisfied

In many ways, this new revenue recognition model simplifies the accounting. However, there are a few areas that are likely to provide challenges to your entire organization, even the IT team. Those areas are variable consideration, contract modifications and enhanced disclosures.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: 3 ways that revenue recognition will impact IT

CIO.com - IT industry - August 9, 2017 - 3:12pm

Has your CFO been talking about something called revenue recognition that's supposed to go live next year? It’s a completely new five-step model that replaces over 150 pieces of existing guidance on how to recognize revenue and consistently applies the same approach across industries – so no more specialized industry rules.

The five-step model is as follows:

  1. Identify the contract with the customer
  2. Identify the performance obligations
  3. Determine the transaction price
  4. Allocate the transaction price to the performance obligations
  5. Recognize revenue when (or as) performance obligations are satisfied

In many ways, this new revenue recognition model simplifies the accounting. However, there are a few areas that are likely to provide challenges to your entire organization, even the IT team. Those areas are variable consideration, contract modifications and enhanced disclosures.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

CIO Hall of Fame honorees

CIO.com - IT industry - August 8, 2017 - 7:54pm

CIO’s Hall of Fame celebrates outstanding personal achievement in IT, honoring the technology executives who, along with significant accomplishments in the field of IT,  have all demonstrated substantial business impact and technology vision within one or more organizations.

They have a reputation for leadership among their peers (or outside entities such as the media or industry experts) and have shown a positive influence on the IT profession and/or advancement of the CIO role. Previous successful nominees have been current CIOs with at least 10-15 years' experience in CIO positions at mid-sized to large enterprises. 

The first step to get to the Hall is to fill out a brief form, which can be completed by the candidate or by someone else. Candidates who meet the criteria will be invited to fill out the final application, which includes short essay questions about past work experience, leadership accomplishments, awards and references. 

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

CIO Hall of Fame honorees

CIO.com - IT industry - August 8, 2017 - 7:54pm

CIO’s Hall of Fame celebrates outstanding personal achievement in IT, honoring the technology executives who, along with significant accomplishments in the field of IT,  have all demonstrated substantial business impact and technology vision within one or more organizations.

They have a reputation for leadership among their peers (or outside entities such as the media or industry experts) and have shown a positive influence on the IT profession and/or advancement of the CIO role. Previous successful nominees have been current CIOs with at least 10-15 years' experience in CIO positions at mid-sized to large enterprises. 

The first step to get to the Hall is to fill out a brief form, which can be completed by the candidate or by someone else. Candidates who meet the criteria will be invited to fill out the final application, which includes short essay questions about past work experience, leadership accomplishments, awards and references. 

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: Don’t let the shadows scare you

CIO.com - IT industry - August 8, 2017 - 3:12pm

If IT is the business, then it is the responsibility of everyone within an organization. Therefore, shadow IT no longer exists and there is no reason to be afraid. The future of the workplace is at stake as rapid advancements in technology are changing the way business is conducted. And because of such changes, IT has become the business.

The concept of shadow IT historically meant an us vs. them civil war between IT and rogue vaguely technical groups that sprouted within various departments – unannounced and unheralded – to deploy departmentally specific solutions. Such a need harkens back to the initial break away from mainframe computing architectures, where a single locked-down system was centralized and controlled by a single entity.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: Don’t let the shadows scare you

CIO.com - IT industry - August 8, 2017 - 3:12pm

If IT is the business, then it is the responsibility of everyone within an organization. Therefore, shadow IT no longer exists and there is no reason to be afraid. The future of the workplace is at stake as rapid advancements in technology are changing the way business is conducted. And because of such changes, IT has become the business.

The concept of shadow IT historically meant an us vs. them civil war between IT and rogue vaguely technical groups that sprouted within various departments – unannounced and unheralded – to deploy departmentally specific solutions. Such a need harkens back to the initial break away from mainframe computing architectures, where a single locked-down system was centralized and controlled by a single entity.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: How scientists are using big data to discover rare mineral deposits

CIO.com - IT industry - August 4, 2017 - 1:18pm

Big data is shaking up the ways our entrepreneurs start their businesses, our healthcare professionals deliver care, and our financial services render their transactions. Now, big data’s reach has expanded so far that it’s revolutionizing the way our scientist search for gas, oil, and even valuable minerals.

Searching under the surface of the earth for valuable mineral deposits has never been easy, but by exploiting recent innovations in big data that allow scientist to gleam the signal from the noise, experts are now capable of discovering and categorizing new minerals more efficiently than ever before.

A new type of mining

By mining big data, or by crunching huge sums of numbers to predict trends, scientist are now capable of mapping mineral deposits in new and exciting ways. Network theory, which has been used with great success in fields ranging from healthcare to national security, is one big data tool that scientist are coming to rely on more and more.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: What is the tech industry’s responsibility to talent in the age of automation?

CIO.com - IT industry - August 3, 2017 - 6:00pm

The struggle to find and hire skilled tech professionals is holding at fever pitch for most businesses today. Around the world I have seen employers take inventive and sometimes aggressive approaches to finding the data, UX, cloud, security, Web, mobile and AI experts their busy IT organizations need. Most recently, a client of mine hosted a global hackathon focused on new product and service development. While the technologists who came to the event focused on the issues and innovation at hand, recruiters and hiring managers were also out in force looking to identify candidates in the unusually target-rich environment.

What struck me as interesting is how many of these talented tech pros can and do work on technologies that are beginning to reduce and eliminate tech jobs. Take for example, cloud developers and solution experts. The level of automation being built into cloud environments today means that fewer and fewer tech experts will be needed to build and manage cloud systems. A recent study by Carl Benedikt Frey and Michael Osborne, “The Future of Employment,” found that “47% of workers in America have jobs at high risk of potential automation.”

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: What is the tech industry’s responsibility to talent in the age of automation?

CIO.com - IT industry - August 3, 2017 - 6:00pm

The struggle to find and hire skilled tech professionals is holding at fever pitch for most businesses today. Around the world I have seen employers take inventive and sometimes aggressive approaches to finding the data, UX, cloud, security, Web, mobile and AI experts their busy IT organizations need. Most recently, a client of mine hosted a global hackathon focused on new product and service development. While the technologists who came to the event focused on the issues and innovation at hand, recruiters and hiring managers were also out in force looking to identify candidates in the unusually target-rich environment.

What struck me as interesting is how many of these talented tech pros can and do work on technologies that are beginning to reduce and eliminate tech jobs. Take for example, cloud developers and solution experts. The level of automation being built into cloud environments today means that fewer and fewer tech experts will be needed to build and manage cloud systems. A recent study by Carl Benedikt Frey and Michael Osborne, “The Future of Employment,” found that “47% of workers in America have jobs at high risk of potential automation.”

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: Hackers are aggressively targeting law firms' data

CIO.com - IT industry - August 3, 2017 - 1:38pm

Behind every splashy headline is a legal industry that’s duking it out – helping to support entrepreneurs and big corporations in a power struggle to dominate their industry. From patent disputes to employment contracts, law firms have a lot of exposure to sensitive information.  Because of their involvement, confidential information is stored on the enterprise systems that law firms use.

This makes them a juicy target for hackers that want to steal consumer information and corporate intelligence.

For an example of this, look no further than the Panama Papers – “…an unprecedented leak of 11.5m files from the database of the world’s fourth biggest offshore law firm, Mossack Fonseca.”

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: Hackers are aggressively targeting law firms' data

CIO.com - IT industry - August 3, 2017 - 1:38pm

Behind every splashy headline is a legal industry that’s duking it out – helping to support entrepreneurs and big corporations in a power struggle to dominate their industry. From patent disputes to employment contracts, law firms have a lot of exposure to sensitive information.  Because of their involvement, confidential information is stored on the enterprise systems that law firms use.

This makes them a juicy target for hackers that want to steal consumer information and corporate intelligence.

For an example of this, look no further than the Panama Papers – “…an unprecedented leak of 11.5m files from the database of the world’s fourth biggest offshore law firm, Mossack Fonseca.”

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: Postcards from the digital transformation of a 100-year-old startup

CIO.com - IT industry - August 2, 2017 - 6:38pm

Companies of all sizes in all industries are grappling with digital transformation. I have the pleasure of leading the innovation team at a nearly 100-year-old startup, and I’m often asked, “How do you track your progress along the journey?”

The short answer is “Everywhere, and all the time.” A digital transformation is, by definition, digital, providing numerous opportunities for tracking. But to be truly transformative, a digital transformation cannot just be about innovation or R&D, it must involve the entire enterprise. We are four years into our digital transformation at Pitney Bowes, and our milestones to date include the successful implementation of a new brand identity, a new enterprise business platform, creation of an open cloud product development platform, a robust Design System, IoT solutions for enterprise and SMB clients, digital customer communications, and many more initiatives that have transformed us into a leading global technology firm. Every day, we place the client at the center of all we do. We also know that the core of our success is our culture of innovation.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: Postcards from the digital transformation of a 100-year-old startup

CIO.com - IT industry - August 2, 2017 - 6:38pm

Companies of all sizes in all industries are grappling with digital transformation. I have the pleasure of leading the innovation team at a nearly 100-year-old startup, and I’m often asked, “How do you track your progress along the journey?”

The short answer is “Everywhere, and all the time.” A digital transformation is, by definition, digital, providing numerous opportunities for tracking. But to be truly transformative, a digital transformation cannot just be about innovation or R&D, it must involve the entire enterprise. We are four years into our digital transformation at Pitney Bowes, and our milestones to date include the successful implementation of a new brand identity, a new enterprise business platform, creation of an open cloud product development platform, a robust Design System, IoT solutions for enterprise and SMB clients, digital customer communications, and many more initiatives that have transformed us into a leading global technology firm. Every day, we place the client at the center of all we do. We also know that the core of our success is our culture of innovation.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: Fresh insights on the information age and cybersecurity

CIO.com - IT industry - August 1, 2017 - 7:20pm

In June, I attended the TIA Connectivity Jam in Dallas, where I participated as a panel moderator and table ambassador on the topic of cybersecurity. The discussions were engaging and informative, and they introduced new ways of addressing the future of IoT, 5G, smart cities, data management, our workforce and more. Here, I share some fresh insights from the event related to the big-picture question of where the information age is taking us, along with the pressing challenge of securing our networks.

A five-category method for identifying industry leaders

I was fascinated and enlightened by the "Information Age" keynote delivered by Southern Methodist University professor Dr. Shervani, who offered a forward-thinking approach to understanding companies and identifying industry leaders in the information age.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: Fresh insights on the information age and cybersecurity

CIO.com - IT industry - August 1, 2017 - 7:20pm

In June, I attended the TIA Connectivity Jam in Dallas, where I participated as a panel moderator and table ambassador on the topic of cybersecurity. The discussions were engaging and informative, and they introduced new ways of addressing the future of IoT, 5G, smart cities, data management, our workforce and more. Here, I share some fresh insights from the event related to the big-picture question of where the information age is taking us, along with the pressing challenge of securing our networks.

A five-category method for identifying industry leaders

I was fascinated and enlightened by the "Information Age" keynote delivered by Southern Methodist University professor Dr. Shervani, who offered a forward-thinking approach to understanding companies and identifying industry leaders in the information age.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: 3 reasons why innovation and technology pilots often don’t succeed

CIO.com - IT industry - August 1, 2017 - 6:50pm

Disruption from new technologies and new business models fundamentally changes companies’ competitive positioning. Most CEOs and boards of directors today recognize their business is at risk if they don’t change, as disruptive competitors will gain ascendency over them. Because they recognize the power of disruptive technologies and the need to change, many invest in pilots to determine whether a technology can create the desired performance outcome. Unfortunately, pilots rarely deliver real value. Furthermore, look at Amazon, GE and other firms that successfully incorporate disruptive technologies into their business model, and you’ll realize they don’t use pilots to drive change. Why not?

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here


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