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How big is your Baan-DB (just Data AND Indexes)
0 - 200 GB
17%
200 - 500 GB
27%
500 - 800 GB
2%
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1200 - 1500 GB
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15%
> 2000 GB
20%
Total votes: 41

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Industry & Technology

Say GDP-aaaRrrgh, streamers: Max Schrems is coming for you, Netflix and Amazon

The Register - January 18, 2019 - 3:30pm
Apple and others also in firing line as complaints filed

Streaming services aren't complying with EU data protection law - namely the General Data Protection Regulation's right of access - according to a fresh suite of complaints aimed at the likes of Netflix, Amazon and Spotify.…

The longstanding NASA-Russian partnership in space may be unraveling

Ars Technica - January 18, 2019 - 3:14pm

Enlarge / Roscosmos head Dmitry Rogozin is photographed in October, 2018, after the launch failure of a Soyuz-FG rocket. (credit: Alexei Filippov/TASS via Getty Images)

After an American Apollo and Soviet Soyuz spacecraft docked in orbit during the height of the Cold War, in 1975, the two leading space powers gradually worked more and more together on civil space activities. Over time, they forged a successful and, among astronauts and engineers at least, even a comfortable bond. But of late, that bond is fraying, and long-term it may unravel entirely.

The most immediate issue involves Dmitry Rogozin, appointed to lead the Russian space corporation Roscosmos in May 2018. Overtly political, Rogozin shares Vladimir Putin's antipathy toward the West. Following the Crimean crisis in 2014, Rogozin was one of seven Russian officials sanctioned by the Obama administration. In response, he taunted NASA, which relied then (and still does) on Russian Soyuz spacecraft to reach the International Space Station.

"After analyzing the sanctions against our space industry, I suggest to the USA to bring their astronauts to the International Space Station using a trampoline,” Rogozin, then a deputy prime minister of Russia over defense and space, tweeted in Russian at the time.

Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Star Trek: Discovery’s second season may boldly go where the first did not

Ars Technica - January 18, 2019 - 3:05pm

Enlarge / Michael Burnham is all of us. (credit: CBS)

In many ways, this season felt very much like a much-needed reset from the previous one. The Klingon war is over, and the Federation is consumed by a new scientific pursuit: mysterious red bursts of light that have appeared across 30,000 light years.

The scene that really drove home the reset was the formal roll call, where our bridge characters say their names—really, directly to the audience.

It’s still baffling that we went an entire season without knowing most of the bridge crew’s names! Yes, we sort of got to know a handful of characters, but there are regular faces that we’ve seen many times on the bridge. If like the other shows, where the bulk of each episode happens in the nerve center of the ship, it would help to know who we’re interacting with.

Read 23 remaining paragraphs | Comments

WHO declares anti-vax movement a global health threat in 2019 - CNET

cNET.com - News - January 18, 2019 - 2:54pm
"Vaccine hesitancy" is listed among air pollution, Ebola and HIV as one of the biggest threats to health this year.

Microsoft partner portal 'exposes 'every' support request filed worldwide' today

The Register - January 18, 2019 - 2:47pm
No customer data visible but hell's bells, Redmond, what have you borked now?

Exclusive Alarmed Microsoft support partners can currently view support tickets submitted from all over the world, in what appears to be a very wide-ranging blunder by the Redmond-based biz.…

Mammoth great white shark may soon be a mommy shark, too-too-too-too-too-too - CNET

cNET.com - News - January 18, 2019 - 2:30pm
In awe at the size of this lass. Absolute unit.

Vodafone signs $550m deal with IBM to offload cloud biz

The Register - January 18, 2019 - 2:15pm
Up to 750 staff transferring to Big Blue. Good luck people... you might need it

Exclusive Vodafone is offloading its cloud and hosting unit to IBM in a $550m eight-year outsourcing deal that will include up to 750 staff packing their bags as they're sent off to new employer Big Blue, sources say.…

Take a ride on the most high-tech ski lift - CNET

cNET.com - News - January 18, 2019 - 2:00pm
The eight-seat Ramcharger 8 opened recently at the Big Sky Resort in Montana. If Apple were to build a chairlift, this might be it.

Twitter admits bug exposed some Android users' protected tweets for years - CNET

cNET.com - News - January 18, 2019 - 1:54pm
A security flaw may have disabled the "Protect your Tweets" setting.

Black Horse slowed down: Lloyds Banking Group confirms problem with 'Faster' payments

The Register - January 18, 2019 - 1:42pm
Friday morning is an ideal time for transfers to have a glitch, agree customers

Lloyds and Halifax bank customers have been warned not to make repeat transactions as the group grapples with a technical glitch with Faster Payments.…

Twenty legal battles that stand out across Ars’ 20 years of covering them

Ars Technica - January 18, 2019 - 1:30pm

Enlarge / The US Supreme Court is shown on the day of the investiture ceremony for new Supreme Court Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh on November 8, 2018 in Washington, DC. (credit: Mark Wilson / Getty Images)

The legal system is often a confounding place, where disputes are adjudicated—it’s a world full of jargon that we journalists try to explain as best we can. And over the last two decades, legal cases have remained a fixture on Ars Technica.

We’ve brought you endless news of initial criminal or civil complaints in that time. And in the most important cases, Ars has followed them, blow by blow, through various motions. We sat in every session for the criminal trial of Silk Road mastermind Ross Ulbricht and took a similar approach to the API patents saga of Oracle v. Google, for instance.

Just this week, Ars sat in the courtroom as Defense Distributed and the State of New Jersey argued over legal jurisdiction and matters of free speech intersecting with future technology. It echoes back to our site's legacy of watching the march of technology and innovation directly intersect with an evolving legal system—it has been nearly 20 years since we covered Microsoft’s infamous antitrust battles around the turn of the century. These literally became the subject of CNN decade documentaries since then.

Read 119 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Lords of the DNS remind admins about Flag Day, Juniper likes Watson and more

The Register - January 18, 2019 - 1:04pm
PING, PING, PING … it's your networking roundup for the week

Roundup To cure some persistent security, implementation, and performance problems in the Domain Name System, the lords of the DNS have proclaimed older implementations as end of life.…

Rocket Report: Iranian booster failure, SpaceX cuts, Vulcan near final design

Ars Technica - January 18, 2019 - 1:00pm

Enlarge / A Falcon 9 rocket launches from Vandenberg Air Force Base. (credit: Aurich Lawson/SpaceX)

Welcome to Edition 1.32 of the Rocket Report! As we get deeper into the new year, the launch business is starting to heat up, especially among the smaller rockets. Companies are eyeing launch sites, securing launch contracts, and scrambling on development of their rockets. This is simply going to be a huge year for small-sat launchers, and we're going to do our best to stay on top of everything.

As always, we welcome reader submissions, and if you don't want to miss an issue, please subscribe using the box below (the form will not appear on AMP-enabled versions of the site). Each report will include information on small-, medium-, and heavy-lift rockets as well as a quick look ahead at the next three launches on the calendar.

Relativity Space to launch from historic Florida site. The company that aspires to 3D print almost the entirety of its rockets has reached an agreement with the US Air Force to launch from historic facilities at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. Relativity Space said Thursday it has a multiyear contract to build and operate its own rocket launch facilities at Launch Complex 16, Ars reported.

Read 24 remaining paragraphs | Comments

For teens, digital technology is good. Or bad. Or maybe neutral?

Ars Technica - January 18, 2019 - 12:30pm

Enlarge (credit: SimpleTexting.com)

In South Korea, people under the age of 16 can’t play online games between midnight and 6am. The UK Parliament has launched an official inquiry into “the impact of social media and screen use on young people’s health.” Meanwhile in the United States, the Wait Until 8th campaign asks parents to delay giving their children a smartphone until they’re in eighth grade. Worry about kids and technology is rampant—so have smartphones, in fact, destroyed a generation?

A paper published in Nature Human Behaviour this week answers that question, often differently, thousands and thousands of times. Researchers Amy Orben and Andrew Przybylski took three huge datasets and threw every possible meaningful question at them. In part, their analysis is an illustration of how different researchers can get wildly different answers from the same data. But cumulatively, the answers they came up with indicate that tech use correlates with a teeny-tiny dent in adolescent well-being—and that there’s a big problem with big data.

High numbers don’t necessarily mean high quality

Studying small numbers of people, or rats, or trees can be a problem for scientists. Comparisons between small groups of subjects might miss a real finding or luck out and find something that looks like a pattern but is actually just noise. And it’s always tricky to generalize from a small group to a whole population. Sometimes small is the only sort of data that’s available, but some research disciplines have had the recent(-ish) boon of gigantic, rich datasets to work with.

Read 15 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Timeline: What's going on with Huawei?

BBC Technology News - January 18, 2019 - 12:27pm
The Chinese telecoms giant was the focus of international scrutiny even before a senior executive's arrest.

Lawyers' secure email network goes down, firm says it'll take 2 weeks to restore

The Register - January 18, 2019 - 12:24pm
75,000 lawyers subject to potential fortnight of faffery

Updated Barristers and court prosecutors have been left scratching their heads this morning after Egress Technologies' CJSM email system went down – with the firm saying it could take up to a fortnight to fully restore it.…

Twitter warns that private tweets were public for years

BBC Technology News - January 18, 2019 - 11:54am
A security flaw meant many private messages were readable for years said Twitter.

I used to be a dull John Doe. Thanks to Huawei, I'm now James Bond!

The Register - January 18, 2019 - 11:25am
We'll know for sure when Huawei reveals a shoe-shaped smartphone

Something for the Weekend, Sir? The name's McLeod. Alessandro McLeod. I am a spy for the secret services.…

At 900k lines of code, ONOS is getting heavy. Can it go on a diet?

The Register - January 18, 2019 - 10:52am
'Net greybeard Douglas Comer talks SDN with El Reg

Interview Software Defined Networking (SDN) has changed the landscape of networking, but along the way it has created its own problems. Doug Comer of Purdue University thinks disaggregating SDN controllers like the Open Source Network Operating System (ONOS) could be a way forward.…

Netflix shows Bird Box and Elite drive subscriber growth

BBC Technology News - January 18, 2019 - 10:05am
The streaming giant says the subscriber growth reflects the success of its original programmes.

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