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Poll
How big is your Baan-DB (just Data AND Indexes)
0 - 200 GB
17%
200 - 500 GB
27%
500 - 800 GB
2%
800 - 1200 GB
10%
1200 - 1500 GB
10%
1500 - 2000 GB
15%
> 2000 GB
20%
Total votes: 41

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Industry & Technology

Old bugs, new bugs, red bugs … yes, it's Oracle mega-update day again

The Register - January 18, 2019 - 3:56am
Out of 284 flaws, 33 are rated critical. Big Red admins have big patches ahead

Oracle admins, here's your first critical patch advisory for 2019, and it's a doozy: a total of 284 vulnerabilities patched across Big Red's product range, and 33 of them are rated “critical”.…

SpaceX to build its Starship in Texas... for now - CNET

cNET.com - News - January 18, 2019 - 3:39am
Elon Musk's company has cancelled its long-term plans to assemble its biggest rockets at the Port of Los Angeles.

Google Play malware used phones’ motion sensors to conceal itself

Ars Technica - January 18, 2019 - 3:00am

Enlarge (credit: Andri Koolme / Flickr)

Malicious apps hosted in the Google Play market are trying a clever trick to avoid detection—they monitor the motion-sensor input of an infected device before installing a powerful banking trojan to make sure it doesn’t load on emulators researchers use to detect attacks.

The thinking behind the monitoring is that sensors in real end-user devices will record motion as people use them. By contrast, emulators used by security researchers—and possibly Google employees screening apps submitted to Play—are less likely to use sensors. Two Google Play apps recently caught dropping the Anubis banking malware on infected devices would activate the payload only when motion was detected first. Otherwise, the trojan would remain dormant.

Security firm Trend Micro found the motion-activated dropper in two apps—BatterySaverMobi, which had about 5,000 downloads, and Currency Converter, which had an unknown number of downloads. Google removed them once it learned they were malicious.

Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Got a Drupal-powered website? You may want to get patching now...

The Register - January 18, 2019 - 2:45am
Open-source CMS gets a pair of critical fixes

Drupal has issued a pair of updates to address two security vulnerabilities in its online publishing platform. The vulns are a little esoteric, and will not affect most sites, but it's good to patch just in case you later add functionality that can be exploited.…

Netflix raised prices because you all are signing up like crazy - CNET

cNET.com - News - January 18, 2019 - 2:29am
The hikes were the first leg of a victory lap. Now 80 million households have watched Bird Box, too.

Qualcomm-FTC lawsuit: Everything you need to know - CNET

cNET.com - News - January 18, 2019 - 2:03am
The antitrust case could decide how smartphones get made in the future -- and what they cost.

NHL teams up with SAP, Apple to build coaching app

ZDnet News - January 18, 2019 - 2:01am
The app leverages the SAP Cloud Platform with SAP HANA to process in-game hockey data from the arena and the NHL's system.

Netflix's Black Mirror: Bandersnatch reveals which ending remains the most hidden - CNET

cNET.com - News - January 18, 2019 - 1:47am
Read on for a how-to guide for spoiling the dark interactive movie.

Virtual cities: Designing the metropolises of the future

BBC Technology News - January 18, 2019 - 1:03am
How 3D software supercharged with real-time data can simulate complex designs before they're built.

Twitter. Android. Private tweets. Pick two... Account bug unlocked padlocked accounts

The Register - January 18, 2019 - 1:01am
Cock-up went unnoticed for two Olympics, one World Cup, an EU referendum, and a US presidential election

Twitter has fessed up to a flaw in its Android app that, for more than four years, was making twits' private tweets public. The programming blunder has been fixed.…

Facebook employees appear to have left 5-star Amazon reviews for Portal - CNET

cNET.com - News - January 18, 2019 - 12:29am
The tech giant says it's asked employees to remove their reviews.

Man drives 6,000 miles to prove Uncle Sam's cellphone coverage maps are wrong – and, boy, did he manage it

The Register - January 18, 2019 - 12:10am
Amazing how a big cash payout focuses the mind

A Vermont state employee drove 6,000 miles in six weeks to prove that the cellular coverage maps from the US government suck – and was wildly successful.…

Mortal Kombat 11 gameplay as seen by a ‘90s arcade rat

Ars Technica - January 18, 2019 - 12:03am

Enlarge / Scorpion has come a long way in Mortal Kombat 11, but he's still a golden ninja with flaming powers, so it works for me.

I was 15 when Mortal Kombat first hit the arcades in 1992. It was a different era then—no social media, no modern Internet to speak of, and we didn't have year-long teaser campaigns for new games. You would just walk into the arcade one day and there was a new cabinet sitting there, maybe back in a corner, like a secret, or maybe in the center of the floor, already gathering a crowd.

Being nostalgic for your teenage years is easy, and I don't want to over-mythologize the arcade of my youth. But there was something special about getting those surprises, and we've lost that. It seems rare now to be hit with the unexpected—dodging spoilers is practically a contact sport. Here was this game like nothing else we'd seen before, and it just appeared.

We were already fighting-game players. Street Fighter II, Fatal Fury, World Heroes—we dropped our quarters into every game we could get our hands on. But Mortal Kombat was different.

Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Karma Automotive and Pininfarina are partnering up - Roadshow

cNET.com - News - January 17, 2019 - 11:54pm
The two companies are teaming up to expand Karma's design portfolio and customization options.

Shutdown threatens even more government websites - CNET

cNET.com - News - January 17, 2019 - 11:53pm
The list of affected federal sites grows as security certificates expire, giving hackers more opportunities to get between you and the website you're visiting.

Baby giraffe gets the most perfect Star Trek name ever - CNET

cNET.com - News - January 17, 2019 - 11:45pm
It's a boy and he's named for a beloved Star Trek alien.

Google will pay Fossil $40 million for smartwatch tech - CNET

cNET.com - News - January 17, 2019 - 11:41pm
The tech giant isn't saying what exactly the tech is.

Ninety7 Jot Portable Battery Base for Google Home Mini review: A sensible Google Home Mini accessory at a reasonable price - CNET

cNET.com - Reviews - January 17, 2019 - 11:38pm
This smart speaker add-on gives the Google Home Mini a day's worth of battery life.

How to pick a reliable car - Roadshow

cNET.com - News - January 17, 2019 - 11:20pm
There are plenty of published car ratings, but they tell you different things.

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