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Poll
How big is your Baan-DB (just Data AND Indexes)
0 - 200 GB
18%
200 - 500 GB
26%
500 - 800 GB
3%
800 - 1200 GB
9%
1200 - 1500 GB
12%
1500 - 2000 GB
12%
> 2000 GB
21%
Total votes: 34

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Industry & Technology

'Outdated' IT and old computers found in Welsh schools

BBC Technology News - December 10, 2018 - 6:49pm
Schools are too far behind technology such as smartphones and iPads in teaching IT, a watchdog says.

Super-solid helium state confirmed in beautiful experiment

Ars Technica - December 10, 2018 - 6:43pm

Enlarge / Computer artwork of the nucleus of a helium atom, or an alpha particle given off during radioactive decay. The nucleus consists of two positively charged protons (red) and two neutral neutrons (green) surrounded by a quantum cloud of gluons, a type of subatomic particle. (credit: Getty Images)

In recent months, I’ve mentioned super-solids a couple of times, which is a bit unusual for something we haven't been sure actually exists. However, a recent paper seems to offer some quite strong confirmation that super-solids are real. That means it is time to delve into the weird and wonderful world of low-temperature helium.

Helium is, without a doubt, the Universe’s weirdest material, beating out molecular hydrogen by a rather long nose. The key to helium’s strangeness is that it is normally a boson: a helium-4 atom consists of two protons, two neutrons, and two electrons, which sums to an even number, making a composite boson.

Helium is confusing

What does all that mean? It means that when cold enough, a group of helium atoms can enter the same quantum state. Even though they are spread out over a whole vessel, they all know something about the condition of their distant neighbors. This enables the helium atoms to flow without resistance, a state called a superfluidity. It's good company among other weird and wonderful properties of helium.

Read 14 remaining paragraphs | Comments

NASA, SpaceX push back Crew Dragon test launch to ISS - CNET

cNET.com - News - December 10, 2018 - 6:22pm
We'll have to wait a few more days before Crew Dragon earns its space wings.

iPad Pro's potential becomes clear with this $99 HyperDrive USB-C hub - CNET

cNET.com - News - December 10, 2018 - 6:14pm
Exclusive: Sanho's six-port HyperDrive USB-C Hub shows that Apple made the right choice when it ditched the Lightning port.

How to survive deadly 'Game of Thrones'? Science finds best strategy - CNET

cNET.com - News - December 10, 2018 - 6:07pm
An analysis of the HBO show's many deaths might reveal the secret to making it to the end of the final season.

Cryptography failure leads to easy hacking for PlayStation Classic

Ars Technica - December 10, 2018 - 6:03pm

Enlarge / The PlayStation Classic's internal USB, removed and picked at as part of the hacking effort. (credit: Yifan Lu / Twitter)

In the days since the PlayStation Classic's official release, hackers have already made great progress in loading other PlayStation games (and even non-PlayStation software) onto the plug-and-play device. What's more, it seems some sloppy cryptography work on Sony's part is key to unlocking the device for other uses.

Console hackers yifanlu and madmonkey1907 were among those who were able to dump the PlayStation Classic's code via the system's UART serial port in the days after its release. From there, as yifanlu laid out on Twitter, the hackers found that the most sensitive parts of the system are signed and encrypted solely using a key that's embedded on the device itself, rather than with the aid of a private key held exclusively by Sony. In essence, Sony distributed the PlayStation Classic with the key to its own software lock hidden in the device itself.

Further examination by yifanlu during a series of marathon, Twitch-streamed hacking sessions found that the PlayStation Classic also doesn't seem to perform any sort of signature check at all for the sensitive bootrom code that's loaded when the system starts up. That makes it relatively trivial to load any sort of payload to the hardware from a USB device at startup, as yifanlu demonstrated with a video of a Crash Bandicoot prototype running on the PlayStation Classic last week.

Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Celebrating K8s crates inflation rate, Linux mates congregate

The Register - December 10, 2018 - 6:00pm
As KubeCon + CloudNativeCon draws nigh, vendors can't contain themselves

A number of open source types are heading toward Seattle, Washington, on Monday, if they're not already installed there, to attend the Cloud Native Computing Foundation's (CNCF) KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America 2018 confab.…

Aquaman makes a splash in China - CNET

cNET.com - News - December 10, 2018 - 5:55pm
The movie has been a huge success since opening there Friday -- two weeks before it shows up in US theaters.

Toyota teases Gazoo Racing Supra Super GT racing concept - Roadshow

cNET.com - News - December 10, 2018 - 5:47pm
The new car is destined for Japan's Super GT race series.

These are the best Green Monday 2018 deals - CNET

cNET.com - News - December 10, 2018 - 5:47pm
There are some surprisingly good ones! Also: What the hell is Green Monday?

McLaren 720S Spider is Britain's newest 212 mph convertible - Roadshow

cNET.com - News - December 10, 2018 - 5:37pm
If you've got the roof down, you can "only" do 202 mph.

Amazon reportedly fires workers in seller scam crackdown - CNET

cNET.com - News - December 10, 2018 - 5:33pm
The company was investigating reports about data leaks and bribes, according to the Wall Street Journal.

Apple denies iPhone import ban in China

BBC Technology News - December 10, 2018 - 5:26pm
Chip-maker Qualcomm says it has won an injunction against Apple in a continuing dispute over intellectual property.

HyperChiller instant-iced-coffee maker makes a great gift at $23 - CNET

cNET.com - News - December 10, 2018 - 5:25pm
Normally $30, this Cheapskate exclusive might be just the thing for the coffee lover in your life.

At least one major carrier lied about its 4G coverage, FCC review finds

Ars Technica - December 10, 2018 - 5:20pm

Enlarge (credit: Aurich Lawson / Getty Images)

Four months after receiving a complaint claiming that Verizon "grossly overstated" its 4G LTE coverage in government filings, the Federal Communications Commission says that at least one carrier is apparently guilty of significant rules violations.

The FCC did not name any specific carrier in its announcement and did not respond to our question about whether Verizon is among the carriers being investigated. But the investigation was apparently triggered by a complaint about Verizon filed in August by the Rural Wireless Association (RWA).

The RWA, which represents rural carriers, made its case to the FCC by submitting speed test data. The speed tests showed the Verizon network wasn't providing 4G LTE service in areas that Verizon claimed to cover, according to the RWA.

Read 10 remaining paragraphs | Comments

The best Instant Pot deals right now - CNET

cNET.com - News - December 10, 2018 - 5:20pm
If you haven't yet bought into the pressure-cooker hype, now's your chance to get in with some aggressive holiday pricing.

Have a gander at this: Amazon agrees not to act as Silicon Valley's foie gras dealer

The Register - December 10, 2018 - 5:14pm
Online marketplace coughs up $100k for selling force-fed birds' livers despite ban

Amazon will not sell pate made from the livers of force-fed ducks and geese in California, and has agreed to pay $100,000 in penalties after a civil suit was brought against its brown box delivery biz.…

Microsoft's rebuilt Edge likely to support Chrome extensions, may come to Xbox One - CNET

cNET.com - News - December 10, 2018 - 5:10pm
The browser's project manager reveals some details about compatibility.

Elon Musk says Navigate on Autopilot will expand to handle traffic lights - Roadshow

cNET.com - News - December 10, 2018 - 5:05pm
Musk wants Tesla's cars to handle a person's entire commute, soup to nuts.

Apple's HomePod is back to its Black Friday price of $250 at Target - CNET

cNET.com - News - December 10, 2018 - 5:03pm
That's $100 off the retail price you'd pay at the Apple Store.

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